I’m a great fan of Teagan Geneviene’s writing. Her serials are enchanting and by the time the latest chapter of the current serial wings its way into my inbox on a Saturday, I’m champing at the bit to see what’s going to happen!

Each week, her readers supply her with three things which she then weaves into her story. In this Saturday’s episode, Teagan used my suggestions —  a Silver Locket, Green Chartreuse and Salmon Koulibiac.

Originally posted on Teagan’s Books.

I’m afraid I gave in to the dramatic again.  I might as well tell you that there is another cliffhanger ahead.  But you’re forewarned, so try not to scream “Akkk!” about my theatrics when you get there.

The multi-talented Sarah Vernon at “Rogues & Vagabonds” sent the three things that fueled the steam locomotive to the Victorian Era for this chapter.  Sarah’s blogs are visual treats.  “Rogues & Vagabonds” is for anyone with a passion for theatre.  The feeling I get when I visit there puts me in mind of the era of this serial.

Here’s the steam locomotive.  Remember to watch for informative and fun links in text and images.  Now, let’s hurry onto the train!  There was a lot going on when we left the amethyst world last time.  All aboard!

27.  Silver Locket, Green Chartreuse, Salmon Koulibiac

Cornelis Drebbel wore a grave expression as Absinthe popped off to confront the Purple Fairy — also known as the one-eyed one horned flying purple people eater.  Our ape host and his housekeeper continued to murmur worriedly about the safety of the tiny Green Fairy.

I looked at the Dutchman.  His mouth twitched.  Then he smirked.  As I drew a breath to ask him what the devil he was thinking, Cornelis burst out laughing.  What preposterous behavior!  I was speechless, my question utterly forgotten.

Viola clutched a silver locket suspended from a chain around her neck.  A tear from her good eye trickled down her cheek.  She looked like she might swoon again.  Cal Hicks patted her shoulder, trying to comfort the violet…

via Copper, the Alchemist, & the Woman in Trousers: Episode 27 | Teagan’s Books.


The image above is my first book cover, which came about because of an approach by Italian writer, Cristian Borghetti, who had come across my original, The Gloria Swanson Tattoo, and thought it would work perfectly for his novel, Le cabinet Masson. I couldn’t have been more delighted. I happen to love the font he’s used, which I was not responsible for but I probably would have chosen something very similar.

Blurb from Amazon (translated by Google and me!):

The painting ‘After the Ink’ by American Dorian Cleavenger was the inspiration for ​​Borghetti’s novel, Le cabinet Masson.

The opera, set in Paris in 1912, in the heart of the Belle Epoque, is a journey into humanity itself, in its instincts, in its passions, in its dark sides.

“The end justifies the means” is the Machiavellian motto of the main character, who is ambitious and unscrupulous, and believes in chasing fame, success, glory and his goal of becoming the best known and most influential tattoo artist in Paris, Europe and the world.

His meeting with the most famous model and femme du monde of Paris seems the springboard by which he can reach long-awaited Olympus artists immortality; in fact, this meeting, in which he tattoos  his indelible mark on her body, becomes the beginning of his fall.

Unwillingly involved in the murder of the woman, the protagonist has to deal with his choices, by his actions, often reckless, dictated by selfishness, by ambition and unbridled lust.

Surrounded by enemies unknown, the victim of a pattern of vendetta that has its roots in his own past, with only the support of a police officer convinced of his innocence, the man tries to survive the total debacle of his dreams and his ambitions, to the loss, not only of fame, the wealth, friendships, true and convenience, but, in the crescendo of a tragic ending, of his own life.

The story sounds intriguing. Le cabinet Masson is currently available at Amazon in print and for Kindle but only in Italian. Cristian hopes to publish a translation into English in the near future. However, if you speak and read Italian, go for it!


N.B. If you are a writer looking for a unique book cover and like my work, please leave a comment and I will email you. Thank you.


Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


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At last I have uploaded these birds to all my art galleries and what a relief it is too!

The Cuckoo’s Note:
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‘Like a Lapwing':
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Ruddy Duck:
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Whirring Pheasant Springs:
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Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


A pair of 18th-century Spanish cannons outside the museum of the Royal Welch Fusiliers in Caernarfon Castle.

A pair of 18th century Spanish cannons outside the museum of the Royal Welch Fusiliers in Caernarfon Castle.

Originally posted on Albert Jack.

The phrase these days is associated with encouraging someone to get a move on, or hurry up and complete a task more quickly than they are presently doing. Like so many English phrases it has a military or naval origin. Loaded cannons would have gunpowder poured into a small ignition hole, which was then held in place with a wooden plug.

But in times of battle, when speed was of the essence, the powder would be pushed in and then held in place by a gun crew-member using his finger. Impatient artillerymen, anxious to fire their cannons at the advancing enemy, would…

via Pull Your Finger Out (Phrase Origins) | Albert Jack.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Originally posted in The Guardian.

Marlon James (Jamaica): A Brief History of Seven Killings (Oneworld)
The first Jamaican writer to be nominated for the Booker, James’s third novel, told in a multitude of voices, builds on the attempted assassination of Bob Marley in 1976 to tell the story of Jamaica over three decades: the guns and corruption, the drugs and the music. “Like a Tarantino remake of The Harder They Come but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner”, said the New York Times.

Anne Tyler (US): A Spool of Blue Thread: A novel (Chatto & Windus)
The Big Theme of Tyler’s career – Family – which has followed her through 20 novels since The Tin Can Tree in 1965, taking in Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant and The Accidental Tourist along the way – is here again. The fresh inflection this time round is the valedictory mood, in what Tyler said would be her last book before…

via Man Booker prize 2015: the longlist – in pictures | Books | The Guardian.

 


My starting point for this piece was a divine original book-plate from 1899 of the British actress Miss Dorothea Baird (1875-1933), which I bought from collectors Vintage Views, along with a few other goodies which will be revealed in the weeks to come.

I will be posting the original on First Night Vintage at some point but here I have superimposed a vintage theatre programme from my archive for a production at the Lyric Theatre onto the curtains of the original. If I were to tell you the number of other images and textures I used, including Island in the Storm, you probably wouldn’t believe me!

Dorothea Baird first appeared on stage  in 1894 for the Oxford University Dramatic Society or OUDS as Iris in The Tempest. She performed in several Shakespeare productions in the following years, often with her husband, H. B. Irving, Sir Henry’s son. She also originated the part of Mrs Darling in Peter Pan (1904). It was a short but notable career, ending in 1913 when she retired and concentrated her energies on charitable causes.

Mr H B Irving Greeting Card

Mr. H. B. Irving (1870 – 1919) as Hamlet at the Adelphi Theatre 1904.

Mr H B Irving Greeting Card

The text below is an extract from what is printed on the reverse side of the book-plate and is an effusive, to say the least, appraisal of Miss Baird and her trumpeted performance in the title role of George du Maurier’s Trilby, produced at the Haymarket Theatre in 1895. You will not have read the like in the 20th or 21st century!

‘MISS DOROTHEA BAIRD made her first appearance on the stage in 1894, when she played Iris in “The Tempest,” and Galatea in “Pygmalion and Galatea,” at the performances of the Oxford University Dramatic Society. After that, Miss Baird went a-touring with Mr. Ben Greet’s company—whence we have derived so many stage recruits—and in her time played many parts. But to Londoners, Miss Dorothea Baird is Trilby; Trilby, in spite of her appearance as the heroine of Mr. Louis Parker’s play, The Happy Life,” at the Duke of York’s Theatre; in spite of her Phoebe in As You Like It,” at the St. James’s; in spite of her charming Diane in A Court Scandal,” at the Court Theatre. And, whatever may be the success in store for her, it is probable that it is of her Trilby we shall tell our grandchildren when we inform them in the usual way that acting was acting in our young days [….] From the above will be learned the impressions of the moment of a remarkable “first night.”‘

Available at the following galleries:
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Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Originally posted on stuartshieldgardendesign.

Vanessa Bell (née Stephen; 30 May 1879 – 7 April 1961) was an English painter and interior designer, a member of the Bloomsbury group and the sister of Virginia Woolf.

Early life and education

Vanessa Stephen was the eldest daughter of Sir Leslie Stephen and Julia Prinsep Duckworth (1846–1895).‪‬ The family, including her sister Virginia; brothers Thoby (1880–1906) and Adrian (1883–1948), and half-brothers, George and Gerald Duckworth, lived at 22 Hyde Park Gate, Westminster, London. She was educated at home in languages, mathematics and history, and took drawing lessons from Ebenezer Cook before she attended Sir Arthur Cope’s art school in 1896, and then studied painting at the Royal Academy in 1901.

In later life she claimed that during her childhood she had been…

via Bloomsbury : Vanessa Bell. | stuartshieldgardendesign.


First Night Design:

ONE FROM THE ARCHIVE. In view of my recent posts about Maude Fealy, I thought it was time to reblog this article from 2012, partly because I have nothing else prepared!

Originally posted on First Night Design:

As I have recently said on Facebook, whenever I sell a theatre-related design on whatever product, my heart leaps. Theatre is in my blood, partly because I spent over 30 years as an actress and partly because I was, as the saying goes, ‘born in a trunk’.  This theatre term used to mean that you were born on tour of theatrical parents and that while other babies spent their days and nights in cribs and prams, you spent yours sustained by the smell of greasepaint and curled up in the theatre’s wardrobe skip, either in the wings or one of  the dressing rooms.  Now it has the more general meaning of having theatrical parentage. I am reminded of another phrase, which was coined by the playwright Tom Robertson, as revealed by Clement Scott in The Drama of Yesterday and Today [Vol. I] (pub. Macmillan & Co, 1899), and of…

View original 335 more words


Yacht: https://www.flickr.com/photos/zakhark/572331622/in/faves-83665426@N05/ Texture: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kerstinfrank-design/19581317079/in/faves-83665426@N05/ Original & vintage art © First Night Design [www.firstnightdesign.wordpress.com]

Sailing to the Moon © Sarah Vernon — Available on various products @ Fine Art America & Fine Art England


‘What can we gain by sailing to the moon if we are not able to cross the abyss that separates us from ourselves? This is the most important of all voyages of discovery, and without it, all the rest are not only useless, but disastrous.’
Thomas Merton


The yacht photograph is by Zakhar Kleyman on Flickr, while the texture I have used in a ‘soft light’ blend (Photoshop) is by Kerstin Frank, also from Flickr. I’ve made it sound as if Flickr is a village!

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Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Christmas_July_2015_Early_01_267Christmas_July_2015_Early_02_192Christmas_July_2015_Early_03_225

USE CODE: JLYCHRISTMAS

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Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Following on from yesterday’s post about Maude Fealy, here she is again in a vintage postcard that asks, ‘Which is the prettiest of all?’ I’d say Maude!

This image is from my theatre collection and I’ve had it since my teens. Yesterday’s image was from The Graphics Fairy.

Clockwise:
Miss Phyllis Dare (1890-1975)
Miss Mabel Love (1874-1953)
Miss Edna May (1878-1948)
Miss Gabrielle Ray (1883-1973)
Miss Zena Dare (1887-1975)
Miss Maude Fealy (1883-1971)

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Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Actress Maude Fealy Postcard
Actress Maude Fealy [1883-1971] Postcards

The American actress Maude Fealy was an exquisite beauty whose career encompassed everything from stage performances in the US, Canada and Britain, as well as silent movies and talking pictures.

She was born in 1883 in Tennessee and died in Los Angeles in 1971. Her mother, Margaret, was an actress and drama teacher so it comes as no surprise to learn that Maude made her stage debut at the age of three in her mother’s production of Faust.

She married an English drama critic in 1907, Louis Sherwin, who wrote for a newspaper in Denver. Her parents were not fans of their daughter’s husband and did everything they could to ruin the marriage; the result was successful and the pair divorced in 1909.

Her second marriage to actor James Durkin sparked the formation of a travelling theatre troupe called the Fealy-Durkin Stock Company. This marriage did not last the course and in 1920 she wed John Cort Jr but this marriage was annulled in 1923.

She continued to divide her time between stage and screen. Her work in Hollywood was helped immeasurably by her friendship with Cecil B DeMille with whom she had appeared on stage. She appeared in almost every one of DeMille’s films, among them The Buccaneer [1958] and The Ten Commandments [1956].

Returning to Denver in the 1940s, she founded a drama school, later going back to Hollywood to do the same.

It is a measure of her friendship with DeMille, who died in 1959, that it was he who left money in his will to pay her funeral expenses when she died in 1971.
Adapted from the mini-biography on IMDb.

See my other film and theatre-related products here.

Maude Fealy on IMDb
Blogging Maude

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


cratedfreeshipping

CHRISTMAS IN JULY! GET FREE SHIPPING THIS WEEK WITH THE CODE: JULYXMAS

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Originally posted on Mark Deeble.

Sound. We don’t pay enough attention to it.

We all have our favourite evocative smells – lemon verbena, petrichor, Atlantic cliff gorse on a summer afternoon… I think I can identify at least half a dozen Cornish sea fish by their smell alone.

But favourite sounds? That takes more thought. Close to the top of my list would be the sound of crab plovers – the lilting contact calls they make – that grow, then fade, as they migrate along the Indian Ocean coast on clear nights; the sound of torrential rain drumming on taught canvas; the laughing, chattering call of a chough…

Sound has the ability to enthral. I remember my delight when, as a teenager, I was first introduced to the sound of a limpet feeding, by natural historian and mentor, Roger Burrows. It was low tide, at dusk, on a beach in South Cornwall. When I lowered my ear next to a foraging limpet, I could hear, quite clearly, the tiny scraping sound that the limpet’s radula made as it rasped back and forwards at the film of algae. Try it, I guarantee it will bring a smile.

All too often though, natural sounds drift pass us, as we are too plugged in to let them in. In an urban environment the ambient noise level can be so high that…

via The Elephant Movie – the sound of it | Mark Deeble.


Originally posted on ReginaJeffers’s Blog.

For nearly 50 years, Americans opened their daily newspaper to read the latest adventure of Charlie Brown, Linus, Lucy, Snoopy, etc., in the “Peanuts” cartoon. On February 13, 2000, Charles Schultz, the series creator passed away peacefully during his sleep from complications of colon cancer. Schultz “once described his life as being ‘one of rejection.’” (Charles M. Schultz Museum)

“The poetry of Schulz’s life began two days after he was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on November 26, 1922, when an uncle nicknamed him ‘Sparky’ after the horse Spark Plug from the Barney Google comic strip. Sparky’s father, Carl, was of German heritage and his mother, Dena, came from a large Norwegian family; the family made their home in St. Paul, where Carl worked as a barber. Throughout his youth, father and son shared a Sunday morning ritual reading the funnies; Sparky was fascinated with strips like Skippy, Mickey Mouse, and Popeye. In his deepest desires, he always knew he wanted to be a cartoonist, and seeing the 1937 publication of his drawing of Spike, the family dog, in the nationally-syndicated Ripley’s Believe it or Not newspaper feature was…

via Do You Remember the First Time You Read a Charles Schultz Cartoon? | ReginaJeffers’s Blog.

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Sarah Vernon

Sarah Vernon

Artist, Actress, Writer

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