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Queer British Art at the Tate is a fascinating exhibition, it is more of a history of homosexuality in Britain told through artistic pieces. Some of the exhibits aren’t very queer, until you …

Source: Queer British Art, Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1 | reviewdonkey


Based on her biographical information and many paintings of carefree beach scenes and small children, Impressionist Martha Walter appears to have been an artist with a charmed life who stuck to saf…

Source: What one painter saw on a visit to Ellis Island | Ephemeral New York

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


BALTHASAR
(singing)
Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,
Men were deceivers ever,

BENEDICK
I would my horse had the speed of your
tongue, and so good a continuer, but keep your
way, i’ God’s name, I have done.
BEATRICE
You always end with a jade’s trick. I know
you of old.
(1.1.139-143)

Source: Beatrice and Benedick Postcard | Zazzle

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah



The London townhouse where the poet created some of his most influential work has been preserved in tribute.

Source: William Blake’s Home – London, England – Atlas Obscura


Abram Games in his studio © Estate of Abram Games

The 1951 Festival of Britain inspired a new generation of creative design. Here are 5 of the leading designers who worked on the festival…

Source: 5 Designers of the Festival of Britain | Heritage Calling

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


This article by Dr Helen Szamuely was first published in London Historians Members’ Newsletter of April 2015.

The cavalier way in which TfL seems to have treated the Paolozzi mosaics in Totte…

Source: London’s Russian Artist: Boris Anrep | London Historians’ Blog

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


St Helen, Bishopsgate by Charles Flower, c.1904

Charles Flower’s Old London Churches were published as postcards in 1904. HistoryLondon revisits the images as they appear today.

Source: Charles Flower’s Old London Churches – HistoryLondonHistoryLondon


The exterior of the Musée Camille Claudel. Photo by Marco Illuminati, courtesy the museum.

A museum dedicated to Camille Claudel has opened, giving recognition to the artist who worked in the “Golden Age of French sculpture.”

Source: Museum Dedicated to Camille Claudel Opens in France | artnet News


Photo post.

Source: Dirk de Herder (1914-2003) – Art Bacchant


Claude Cahun, Self-Portrait, 1928.

For Claude Cahun, resisting normalcy was a lifelong pursuit. Born in 1894, she was a genderqueer pioneer, Jewish Nazi fighter, and radical collage artist. The French photographer’s self-portraits are a focused interrogation of identity and gender fluidity. Rediscovered in the 1990s, her work reminds us that the impact of one person’s refusal can ripple for centuries.

The daughter of prominent Jewish publishers, Cahun was born…

Source: This queer Jewish photographer resisted the Nazis and escaped death—and made great art


This is quite the most extraordinary automaton I’ve ever seen and I suspect you might enjoy it also.

‘The story of Pierre Jaquet Droz and his sons is one of the most moving in the history of Horology. Born in 1721, Pierre Jaquet Droz, master of time in the Age of Enlightenment – mechanical genius, avant-garde creator of jewellery watchmaking and composer of poetry and dreams — is one of the most fascinating figures of the period.

After a few years’ absence from the world of watchmaking, and an intermediate period marked by the presence of foreign shareholders, the brand was acquired in 2000 by the Swatch Group. It returned to its town of origin, La Chaux-de-Fonds.’

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Bernhard Kretzschmar (1889-1972).

Source: BERNHARD KRETZSCHMAR | Beauty Bellezza Beauté


ks
Kurt Schwitters (1887-1948).

Source: KURT SCHWITTERS | Beauty Bellezza Beauté


Elephants in a 13th-century manuscript. THE BRITISH LIBRARY/ROYAL 12 F XIII

The animals in the image above are elephants. They were drawn sometime around the 13th or 14th century in a medieval bestiary, a type of book that described animals large and small, real and fantastic. But to a modern eye, the line between the real and the imagined is…

Source: Why Did Medieval Artists Give Elephants Trunks That Look Like Trumpets? | Atlas Obscura


The Morning of St. Valentine – John Callcott-Horsley

The Victorians were very good at taking an idea and running with it. The present day commercialisation of Valentine’s Day can be laid at their feet. And the man to thank (or blame) is Sir Row…

Source: My Victorian Valentine | Vintage Treasures

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