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Yes, you’ve seen this post before if you’ve followed me for a while but ARTLARK repost in a way that removes the original link so here we go again!

On the 22nd of August 1908, painter and pioneering photojournalist Henri Cartier-Bresson was born in Chanteloup-en-Brie, France. By self-admission, his first true love of photography was inspired b…

Source: Cartier-Bresson’s Street Photography: The Perfect Take | A R T L▼R K


“Progress might have been alright once, but it has gone on too long.”

Ogden Nash, an American poet known for his droll and playful verse, wrote over 500 pieces of comic verse, the best of which was published in 14 volumes between 1931 and his death in 1971. He freque…

Source: August 19, 1902: Parsley Is Gharsley – Wretched Richard’s Almanac


I’m looking for London subjects for an exhibition opening in October exploring the relationship people living with long-term invisible conditions (both physical and emotional) have with their…

Source: Portrait Subjects Wanted! – Curses and Riots


For violations of disciplinary and punishment regulations, prisoners are given 25 blows on the trestle. Georg Tauber himself is flogged. He suffers a ruptured lung and torn buttock muscles. LOAN FROM MONIKA HOFER AND ULRIKE DÜMMLER, MUNICH

WHEN DR. SIGMUND RASCHER OF the Schutzstaffel (SS), a paramilitary organization of Nazi Germany, started conducting his merciless medical experiments at the Dachau concentration camp using prisoners as guinea pigs, he sent for a prisoner, an artist, to document his…

Source: The Prisoner Who Painted Dachau’s Horrors – Atlas Obscura


“A writer is someone who has taught his mind to misbehave.” — Oscar Wilde, Irish, writer, playwright, novelist, essayist, poet

Source: “A writer is someone who has taught his mind to…” – Art of Quotation


There’s a luscious quote in this post from Exploring London!

As you may have realised (the new £10 banknote anyone?), this month marks 200 years since the death of Jane Austen in Winchester on 18th July, 1817, so to mark the occasion, we’re looking at …

Source: 10 sites of significance in Jane Austen’s London…1. 10 Henrietta Street, Covent Garden… | Exploring London


Kyra Kramer recently shared this post on Austen Authors. It speaks so poignantly of the loss of Jane Austen that I thought it appropriate to share here with you on the 200th Anniversary of Jane Aus…

Source: 18 July 1817: The Death of Jane Austen, a Guest Post by Kyra Kramer | ReginaJeffers’s Blog


A re-post to commemorate the death of the niece of my several times removed grandfather Theophilus Leigh. On this day in 1817, Jane Austen, daughter of Cassandra Leigh and George Austen, died in Winchester from what has at different times been thought to be cancer, tuberculosis and Addison’s Disease. The latest suggestion is arsenic poisoning. Enjoy this showing of her humour.

Forget the shy, retiring Jane Austen — we have her nephew James Edward Austen-Leigh’s memoir of his aunt to blame for that idea — here is an extract from a letter she wrote from Steventon to …

Source: First Night Design | Jane Austen Gets Drunk | First Night Design

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


“I get out my work and have a show for myself before I have it publicly. I make up my own mind about it-how good or bad or indifferent it is. After that, the critics can write what they pleas…

Source: “…flattery and criticism go down the same drain and I am quite free.” – Art of Quotation


Gustave Courbet, “The Stone Breakers”, 1849 – destroyed during World War II when a transport vehicle moving the pictures to the castle of Königstein, near Dresden, was bombed by A…

Source: MASTERPIECES LOST DURING II WORLD WAR – Beauty Bellezza Beauté


The news is good on the ♥ front.

The consultant at the hospital in Southampton (what a soulless place the town is) said that although the condition was serious, there was no need to put me through an operation just yet. He’s happy to have the heart checked every six months and go from there. The echocardiograms between last December and this week have shown that progress is slow. If any sign of increased deterioration is detected, the first thing they’ll do is try me on medication. The surgery will have to happen at some point but he hoped it would be a few years down the line.

I feel as though I’ve been holding my breath for six months and at last breathed out. In order to give me time to continue breathing out, you may find that my posts are not as regular as usual. I want to enjoy the summer (such as it is in the UK) and get out and about rather than pore over the computer and social media.

In between time, ain’t we got fun!

If you’re not aware of Ellen Hawley and her blog, Notes from the UK, you’re in for a treat. An American living in Cornwall, she casts her beady eye on the English — our laws, foibles, oddities and customs — in ways that will have you hooting with laughter. I’m re-blogging one of her recent posts partly so I can showcase my ducks. (Ellen talks about ducks, real and rubber) I say ‘my’ but they’re actually based at the duck pond within the grounds of the Isle of Wight hospital.

And now for Ellen’s musings —

‘People involved in British politics swear that politicians get elected (and unelected) mostly over potholes and garbage pickup, although it isn’t called garbage in Britain it’s called, um, somethin…’

Source: Of potholes and politics | Notes from the U.K.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Source: Creamy Pea & Spinach Pasta: A 10 Minute Meal – DeliciouslyElla


An Auburn Beauty

I am sure that the artist Émile Vernon and I must be related somewhere along the line! My father’s side of the family came over with William the Conqueror from a place called Vernon in France. I’m doing research on my family tree so I’ll let you know!

Source: Émile Vernon (1872-1919) – Art Bacchant

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


June 27 [the day before yesterday] is the birthday of the great French poster artist Paul Colin (1892-1985). A native of Nancy, Colin attended the École des Beaux-Arts and became a master of Art Deco style, incorporating ear…

Source: Paul Colin: The Visual Spirit of Jazz Age Paris | Travalanche


Queer British Art at the Tate is a fascinating exhibition, it is more of a history of homosexuality in Britain told through artistic pieces. Some of the exhibits aren’t very queer, until you …

Source: Queer British Art, Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1 | reviewdonkey

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