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It’s time for another of my Edward Steichen-like Hollywood makeovers. When I’m in need of some glamour, I head straight for the silent movie headshots of the 1920s, especially as found on Hello Tuesday at Deviant Art, which is where I discovered this photograph of Louise Brooks.


“I never gave away anything without wishing I had kept it; nor kept anything without wishing I had given it away.”
Louise Brooks


Some of you may remember that I was originally inspired by Edward Steichen’s famous photograph of actress Gloria Swanson covered in lace (Museum of Modern Art).  I’ve already done one such of Louise Brooks and this is ‘Take 2’!

In what one might say is now time-honoured fashion, I overlaid Brooks with this lace effect vintage wallpaper from MGB-Stock.


“Most beautiful dumb girls think they are smart and get away with it, because other people, on the whole, aren’t much smarter.”
Louise Brooks


For more Hollywood Tattoo makeovers, click here.

Available at the following galleries:
Redbubble
Crated
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK
Fine Art America
Fine Art England
Saatchi Art

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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Actress Maude Fealy Postcard
Actress Maude Fealy [1883-1971] Postcards

The American actress Maude Fealy was an exquisite beauty whose career encompassed everything from stage performances in the US, Canada and Britain, as well as silent movies and talking pictures.

She was born in 1883 in Tennessee and died in Los Angeles in 1971. Her mother, Margaret, was an actress and drama teacher so it comes as no surprise to learn that Maude made her stage debut at the age of three in her mother’s production of Faust.

She married an English drama critic in 1907, Louis Sherwin, who wrote for a newspaper in Denver. Her parents were not fans of their daughter’s husband and did everything they could to ruin the marriage; the result was successful and the pair divorced in 1909.

Her second marriage to actor James Durkin sparked the formation of a travelling theatre troupe called the Fealy-Durkin Stock Company. This marriage did not last the course and in 1920 she wed John Cort Jr but this marriage was annulled in 1923.

She continued to divide her time between stage and screen. Her work in Hollywood was helped immeasurably by her friendship with Cecil B DeMille with whom she had appeared on stage. She appeared in almost every one of DeMille’s films, among them The Buccaneer [1958] and The Ten Commandments [1956].

Returning to Denver in the 1940s, she founded a drama school, later going back to Hollywood to do the same.

It is a measure of her friendship with DeMille, who died in 1959, that it was he who left money in his will to pay her funeral expenses when she died in 1971.
Adapted from the mini-biography on IMDb.

See my other film and theatre-related products here.

Maude Fealy on IMDb
Blogging Maude

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Charlie Chaplin 1889–1977

“A comedy with a smile–and perhaps a tear”

This iconic image from Charlie Chaplin’s 1921 film, The Kid,  in which he starred as the Tramp with  Jackie Coogan as The Child and Edna Purviance as The Woman, is now available at First Night Vintage on greeting cards, postcards, posters and wrapped canvas.  Chaplin had written The Kid with Coogan in mind after seeing the child actor perform.

While checking the date of the film on the Internet Movie Database, I was touched to read about the reunion between Chaplin and Coogan in 1972. Chaplin had returned to the United States for the first time in twenty years to pick up the Handel Medallion award in New York and a Lifetime Achievement Oscar in Hollywood.

To set the scene for this reunion, it should be said that the reason for Chaplin’s enforced absence was down to the US government who had suspected him of Communist sympathies because of what they perceived as subversive messages in his films, as well as questioning his morality after several earlier escapades related to women, two of whom—if memory serves–were underage.

Although he was subpoenaed  in 1947 by the House Un-American Activities (HUAC), he was never actually required to testify as they ultimately decided there was not enough evidence.  However, having flown to London in 1952 for the British première of Limelight, Chaplin was refused re-entry so that he and his family decided to move to Switzerland, where he, his fourth wife Oona O’Neill, and their children, remained until he died in 1977.

When Chaplin landed at Los Angeles airport in 1972, he shook hands with those who had come to greet him but when he recognised Jackie Coogan among them, he hugged him warmly and said, “You know, I think I would rather see you than anybody else.”

My Autobiography


The Kid [DVD] [1921]

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

 

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