You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Photographer’ tag.


Claude Cahun, Self-Portrait, 1928.

For Claude Cahun, resisting normalcy was a lifelong pursuit. Born in 1894, she was a genderqueer pioneer, Jewish Nazi fighter, and radical collage artist. The French photographer’s self-portraits are a focused interrogation of identity and gender fluidity. Rediscovered in the 1990s, her work reminds us that the impact of one person’s refusal can ripple for centuries.

The daughter of prominent Jewish publishers, Cahun was born…

Source: This queer Jewish photographer resisted the Nazis and escaped death—and made great art


Size: Standard Size Business Card, 3.5″ x 2.0″

When it comes to your business, don’t wait for opportunity, create it! Make a lasting impression with quality cards that WOW.

  • Dimensions: 3.5″ x 2.0″
  • Full color CMYK print process
  • Double sided printing for no additional cost
  • 100% satisfaction guarantee

Paper Type: Signature UV Matte

An upgrade from our Standard Matte, Signature UV Matte features a thicker and stiffer paper coated with a protective finish that can be written on. It provides the perfect base for creating long-lasting, high-quality designs with robust color and detail.

  • 18 pt thickness/ 325 GSM
  • Bright white, matte finish
  • UV coating adds an additional layer of protection
  • Made and printed in the USA

Source: Vesta Tilley Business Card | Zazzle

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


“It is my deepest wish that photography, instead of falling in the domain of industry, of commerce, will be included among the arts. That is its sole, true place, and that is the direction th…

Source: “It is my deepest wish that photography…will be included among the arts.” – Art of Quotation


Carlotta Corpron, Nature Dancer, 1943

Carlotta Corpron was born in Blue Earth, Minnesota, but spent fifteen years of her youth in India. She returned to the United States in 1920 to earn degrees in art education at Michigan State Norma…

Source: Fantastic 1940s Photography by Carlotta Corpron | FROM THE BYGONE


This photograph of Berenice Abbott was taken by Hank O'Neal at his Downtown Sound Studio in New York City, 18 November 1979 [Wikimedia]

In the summer of 2014, I posted a marvellous photograph of Penn Station by Berenice Abbott. Here are many more treats, including Penn.

Photograph of Berenice Abbott (left) was taken by Hank O’Neal at his Downtown Sound Studio in New York City, 18 November 1979 [Wikimedia]


Manhattan, New York, by Berenice Abbott (1930s)

Berenice Abbott (1898 – 1991), née Bernice Abbott, was an American photographer best known for her black-and-white photography of New York City architecture and urban design of the 1930’s. Ab…

Source: Berenice Abbott (1898-1991), Vintage Photos of New York City | FROM THE BYGONE


Originally posted on  ღ Vintage Blog.

In 1844 Pierre-Louis Pierson began operating a studio in Paris that specialized in hand-colored daguerreotypes. In 1855 he entered into a partnership with Léopold Ernest and Louis Frédéric Mayer, who also ran a daguerreotype studio. The Mayers had been named “Photographers of His Majesty the Emperor” by Napoleon III the year before Pierson joined them. Although the studios remained at separate addresses, Pierson and the Mayers began to distribute their images under the joint title “Mayer et Pierson,” and together they became the leading society photographers in Paris (source).

Pierre Louis Pierson´s most interesting professional project is the close collaboration he led with Virginia Oldoini, the Countess of Castiglione. She directed Pierre-Louis Pierson to help her create…

via Pierre Louis Pierson (1822 – 1913) – Countess Virginie de Castiglione | ღ Vintage Blog.


Re-blogged from my history site.

First Night History

Originally posted on The Public Domain Review.

Photograph of a Sinhalese woman by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1875 Photograph of a Sinhalese woman by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1875

Leaving her close-knit artistic community on the Isle of Wight at the age of sixty to join her husband on the coffee plantations of Ceylon was not an easy move for the celebrated British photographer Julia Margaret Cameron. Eugenia Herbert explores the story behind the move and how the new environment was to impact Cameron’s art.

The Victorian photographer Julia Margaret Cameron is currently undergoing a revival with a recent exhibition of her work at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. She has long evoked interest not only because of her distinctive style but also because of her eccentric personality, her dominant — very dominant — role in a circle that in many ways prefigured the Bloomsbury of her grandniece, Virginia Woolf. But there was another strand in her life that was…

View original post 41 more words


Penn Station, Manhattan

Penn Station, Manhattan

With thanks to Art Lark

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

TRANSLATE

Award-Free Blog

About Me

about.me

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14,866 other followers

Archives

Categories

Artists 4 Peace

Twitter

FND on Twitter

Facebook

FND on Facebook

YesterdayAfter

© Sarah Vernon and First Night Design 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Sarah Vernon and First Night Design with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Sauce Box

Running my sauce box about my humorous human encounters and probably some other stuff. Enjoy!

scribblesofstageandscreen

Theatre, Film and TV.

Smart History Blog

Compelling Stories of Russian History

Newcastle Photography

Photography Blog by Chris Egon Searle

Brave and Reckless

Reclaiming my inner badass at 50

Gretchen Del Rio's Art Blog

Watercolor paintings

Today in History

"Tell me a fact, and I'll learn. Tell me a truth, and I'll believe. But tell me a story, and it will live in my heart forever." - Steve Sabol, NFL Films

The Architect & I

The Nazis assigned him a number but I wanted the world to know his name.

%d bloggers like this: