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Size: Fleece Blanket, 60″x80″

It’s hard to cuddle by yourself. But with these fully customizable comfy fleece blankets, you won’t have to anymore. Customize the entire front panel and wrap yourself in personalized plush luxury. Delicate, soft and colorful, it’s the perfect blanket for picnics in the park, outdoor events, and cozy winter snuggles.

  • Available in 3 different sizes: small (30″x40″); medium (50″x 60″); large (60″x 80″)
  • 100% buttery soft and cozy polyester fleece
  • Edge-to-edge sublimation printing in vibrant full color
  • Sturdy double edge stitching for a clean finish
  • Back color is off-white
  • Machine washable, gentle cycle, mild detergent
  • Tumble dry low

Source: Through a Glass Darkly Fleece Blanket | Zazzle

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Hope you all had a splendid Christmas Day and Boxing Day.

Style: A7 Greeting Card

Classic envelope for invitations and greeting cards. 7 ¼” wide x 5 ¼” high. Works well with laser or inkjet printers. Made for 7″ x 5″ or smaller invitations and cards. Includes free inside printing.

  • Designer Tip: To ensure the highest quality print, please note that this product has multiple customizable design areas. The unfolded outside design area measures 9.2″ x 11.3″. For best results, please add 1/8″ bleed. The unfolded inside design area measures 9.2″ x 11.3″. For best results, please add 1/8″ bleed.

Paper Type: Basic

Your business and personal mailings will stand out with this smooth, vibrant, matte, 80lb text-weight paper. Contains 50% recycled content (10% post-consumer and 40% pre-consumer waste).

Source: The Peacock Collection Envelope | Zazzle

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


As I’m still catching up from my lack-of-internet-adventure, here’s another post from the archive.

First Night Design

Hello, My Friends,

It seems I can never have enough images from, yes, you’ve guessed, The Graphics Fairy!  On this occasion I used a beautiful peacock I’d had for a while but not found a use for.  And then, by accident, I found it.

Through a Glass Darkly started with ‘off-cuts’ from a another design to which I added a page from an old family album, a photograph of a window and various textures.  I made a lot of blending changes in Photoshop until I was pleased with the result.  However, it wasn’t until I added the peacock so that it could be seen through the window that I knew the piece was finished.

Having now set up my gallery at RedBubble, I’m delighted to say that this latest design has proved popular with my fellow artists.  I do hope you like it and would love to hear…

View original post 298 more words


When I prepared this post last night, the title of the artwork was Marmalade Peacock. Marmalade Peacock? It’s the first phrase that came to mind because of the background. And I’m thinking Frank Cooper’s Original Oxford Coarse Marmalade! It was my father’s favourite but what he didn’t realise was that my mother used to get a cheaper equivalent and transfer it into a Cooper’s jar. Of course.

When I woke up this morning, a song from Sandy Wilson’s musical, Valmouth, sung by Cleo Laine, was playing on an endless loop in my head and I knew I would change the title to The Cry of the Peacock. Valmouth was based on Valmouth and Other Stories by Ronald Firbank, which was about an imaginary spa resort frequented by those of a certain age. It was not well-received with ‘reactions ranging from outrage to derision’ when it opened in Liverpool in 1958. This was doubtless because the satire covered subjects like homosexual as well as heterosexual love and sex, not to mention religion. Nevertheless, it did transfer to London with loud murmurings about what the Lord Chamberlain was doing giving it a licence.

Valmouth and Other Stories by Ronald Firbank

I was far too young to see it at the time but I was brought up on the music, which I love. It was revived at Chichester Festival Theatre in 2000, a production that included one original cast member, Fenella Fielding. In the original, Fielding and Laine had starred alongside the likes of Doris Hare, Peter Gilmore and Aubrey Woods. The All Music website describes it as ahead of its time and prefiguring the work of Stephen Sondheim and I agree there are similarities.

In terms of creation, I blended the handwritten document from my Mallards and Swan Collage with a friend’s photo of a Sri Lankan cave painting. The peacock, which long-term visitors will know I’ve used before, is from The Graphics Fairy.

Photography Prints

Sadly, YouTube does not have the great Cleo Laine singing Cry of the Peacock so here she is singing another number from Valmouth called Big Best Shoes.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Hello, My Friends,

It seems I can never have enough images from, yes, you’ve guessed, The Graphics Fairy!  On this occasion I used a beautiful peacock I’d had for a while but not found a use for.  And then, by accident, I found it.

Through a Glass Darkly started with ‘off-cuts’ from a another design to which I added a page from an old family album, a photograph of a window and various textures.  I made a lot of blending changes in Photoshop until I was pleased with the result.  However, it wasn’t until I added the peacock so that it could be seen through the window that I knew the piece was finished.

Having now set up my gallery at RedBubble, I’m delighted to say that this latest design has proved popular with my fellow artists.  I do hope you like it and would love to hear your thoughts.  Through a Glass Darkly will soon be available on all products at my Zazzle gallery.

The title comes from a phrase in the Bible: St Paul’s 1st Epistle in Corinthians 13.  According to William Harris, Professor Emeritus at Middlebury College in Vermont, USA—

‘…centuries of English speakers have interpreted [it] as peering through a clouded window pane. But when the King James translation was made, a glass was the standard word for a mirror, since the new mirrors of that time were like ours, with a silvered coating applied to the back of a sheet of glass. The original Greek text has dia spektrou, or by means of a mirror, but Greek mirrors were made of highly polished brass which have a weak and imperfect mirror-image, so the figure has an entirely different thrust. Now you see yourself as if you were looking in your brass mirror, but THEN you will have a perfect mirror-image of yourself, you will see yourself as you really are. Of course there is an error in this too, since mirrors reverse right and left, but in the mirror of Heaven you will come fact to face with your real self, see yourself truly as you really are. It is singularly difficult to translate this passage from the Greek, since modern mirrors do give the impression of perfect reflection, and the original meaning is lost’.

I am certainly not the first to use the phrase for  a number of books, plays, films and other art works go by this title including Swedish film director Ingmar Bergman’s Oscar-winning 1961 film, a 1987 lecture given by the American polymath George Steiner, and a biography of the British writer and playwright Patrick Hamilton by Nigel H Jones.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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