You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘pastoral’ tag.


HAPPY EASTER!

FROM THE ARCHIVE 31st March 2014 & 2015 because another year has gone and I still haven’t created a new Easter image!
May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design

May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design

I’m never quite sure how to categorise creations like May Easter Joy Attend You. Is it a collage? Is it digital art, a term that applies to everything I do? Why do I concern myself? Sites like Saatchi Art and Fine Art America need  you to add this information when you upload an image. It drives me nuts, partly because I loathe categories.

The method I use is collage in that I prepare a background and then bring in elements around a particular theme and blend to a seamless whole, rather than what is strictly known as collage where elements are arranged seemingly haphazardly such as in Indian Glories.

In this instance, I prepped a background by doctoring one of Kerstin Frank’s textures, the same one I used for Alice’s Adventures.

Some of the Easter elements I brought in were discarded and replaced but not before I’d worked on them quite substantially — all good experience and not a waste of time!

These rabbits looked best in the Darken mode. But this meant the egg was far from clear. I used the Lasso Tool to select it (the Magnetic Tool is never accurate enough unless you are working with sharply defined objects) and created a new layer for the egg alone. This layer I left in its Normal state and placed it on top of the original egg. It needed touching up with the Brush and Clone Stamp Tools before I was satisfied.

The Darken mode also meant that the lower part of the right-hand rabbit had taken on the green of the background. This needed adjustment which I did by tracing the exact shape of the offending part with the Lasso Tool.  I moved to the background image and chose a lighter area in the ‘sky’ to create a new layer of the rabbit-leg shape. I left it in a Normal state and placed it behind the rabbit. Several colour adjustments were needed until the rabbit’s nether regions matched the rest of his body!

The Multiply mode was ideal for the hot air balloon but left the chicks in the basket more green than yellow. Mind you, one could argue that would be appropriate as surely the poor little blighters would be air sick! I used the same technique on them as I did on the egg to bring their yellow feathers back to life.

This left me with the bottom half of the balloon which, like the chicks and the rabbit, had taken on too much of the background to match up with the rest of the balloon. I used the same procedure as with the rabbit’s nether regions to bring it up to scratch.

I had originally planned to use the Easter greeting on the hot air balloon graphic at the top of the image but it failed to make the impact I had envisaged so I made a type layer instead with a font called Great Vibes.

The last touch was using the graphic [left] by removing its border and background and applying a ‘drop shadow’ and ‘bevel and emboss’ effect.

 

 

 

Available at the following galleries:
Redbubble
Crated
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK
Fine Art America
Fine Art England

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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The pastoral tradition — whether poetry, music, literature or painting — has long been popular, particularly the art of the 19th century when Victorians lapped up engaging scenes of country life. It was an idealised version of the truth which has led to the erroneous assumption that life in the countryside is a deal more peaceful and beautiful than town. It’s an assumption that pertains to this day and there are many who tell a tale of moving away from the relentless struggle in the cities, perhaps buying a small holding, only to discover that it is a good deal smellier and dirtier than town and earning enough to survive is well-nigh impossible. There are exceptions, of course, but unless you’ve had a countryside upbringing, it can come as a shock.

As soon as I saw this photograph of a modern farming scene by Vladimir Kudinov from Unsplash, I decided to follow the pastoral tradition and age the image. Whether I’ve succeeded is for you to say but I’m quite pleased with the result.

Using Photoshop I ‘sponged’ and redefined the machine to make it look as if it were a bale of hay being transported. I did the same ‘sponging’ with the modern levers where the farmer is sitting. When I was happy, I added the 2LO Broken 17 texture from 2 Lil’ Owls and set it to the ‘screen’ mode.

Next I added a texture from Kerstin Frank, making it less saturated and more of a muted green than the original — click through to see her original texture. This I set to the ‘multiply’ mode.

Bringing in the Harvest
Bringing in the Harvest

Prints available at Crated and the DODO iPad Case at Zazzle. Soon to be available on all products at the following galleries:
Redbubble
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK
Fine Art America
Fine Art England
Saatchi Art

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Sadly, I haven’t had a chance to create any more Easter designs this year, partly because I’ve run out of ideas. I’m bored with eggs and rabbits and whimsy, and nothing amusing is coming to mind, so here’s a re-post of May Easter Joy Attend You from 2014 of which I’m rather fond even though it contains rabbits and chicks and an egg!

I dedicate this re-post to the artist Mary of Oil Pastels by Mary because we were discussing working with layers in Photoshop a couple of days ago. Do visit Mary’s blog to see her beautiful work.

May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design

May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design
Available as Posters, Cards, and Prints [Redbubble]

I’m never quite sure how to categorise creations like May Easter Joy Attend You. Is it a collage? Is it digital art, a term that applies to everything I do? Why do I concern myself? Sites like Saatchi Art and Fine Art America need  you to add this information when you upload an image. It drives me nuts, partly because I loathe categories.

The method I use is collage in that I prepare a background and then bring in elements around a particular theme and blend to a seamless whole, rather than what is strictly known as collage where elements are arranged seemingly haphazardly such as in Indian Glories.

In this instance, I prepped a background by doctoring one of Kerstin Frank’s textures, the same one I used for Alice’s Adventures.

Some of the Easter elements I brought in were discarded and replaced but not before I’d worked on them quite substantially — all good experience and not a waste of time!

These rabbits looked best in the Darken mode. But this meant the egg was far from clear. I used the Lasso Tool to select it (the Magnetic Tool is never accurate enough unless you are working with sharply defined objects) and created a new layer for the egg alone. This layer I left in its Normal state and placed it on top of the original egg. It needed touching up with the Brush and Clone Stamp Tools before I was satisfied.

The Darken mode also meant that the lower part of the right-hand rabbit had taken on the green of the background. This needed adjustment which I did by tracing the exact shape of the offending part with the Lasso Tool.  I moved to the background image and chose a lighter area in the ‘sky’ to create a new layer of the rabbit-leg shape. I left it in a Normal state and placed it behind the rabbit. Several colour adjustments were needed until the rabbit’s nether regions matched the rest of his body!

The Multiply mode was ideal for the hot air balloon but left the chicks in the basket more green than yellow. Mind you, one could argue that would be appropriate as surely the poor little blighters would be air sick! I used the same technique on them as I did on the egg to bring their yellow feathers back to life.

This left me with the bottom half of the balloon which, like the chicks and the rabbit, had taken on too much of the background to match up with the rest of the balloon. I used the same procedure as with the rabbit’s nether regions to bring it up to scratch.

I had originally planned to use the Easter greeting on the hot air balloon graphic at the top of the image but it failed to make the impact I had envisaged so I made a type layer instead with a font called Great Vibes.

The last touch was using the graphic above by removing its border and background and applying a ‘drop shadow’ and ‘bevel and emboss’ effect.

May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design

May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design
Available as Posters, Cards, and Prints

Available at the following galleries:
Redbubble
Crated
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK
Fine Art America
Fine Art England

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Still no connection so one from the archive.

First Night Design

Little Bo Peep illustrated by Walter CraneLittle Bo Peep illustrated by Walter Crane 1885 [Wikipedia]

Well now, boys and girls, are you sitting comfortably? Then I’ll begin.

Once upon a time, there was a little English shepherdess who lost all her sheep.

Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep
And doesn’t know where to find them.
Leave them alone and they’ll come home,
Bringing their tails behind them.
Little Bo Peep fell fast asleep
And dreamt she heard them bleating,
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they were all still fleeting.
Then up she took her little crook
Determined for to find them.
She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they left their tails behind them.
It happened one day, as Bo Peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails side by side
All hung on a tree to dry.
She heaved a sigh, and…

View original post 553 more words


May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design

May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design
Available as Posters, Cards, and Prints

I’m never quite sure how to categorise creations like May Easter Joy Attend You. Is it a collage? Is it digital art, a term that applies to everything I do? Why do I concern myself? Sites like Saatchi Art and Fine Art America need  you to add this information when you upload an image. It drives me nuts, partly because I loathe categories.

The method I use is collage in that I prepare a background and then bring in elements around a particular theme and blend to a seamless whole, rather than what is strictly known as collage where elements are arranged seemingly haphazardly such as in Indian Glories.

In this instance, I prepped a background by doctoring one of Kerstin Frank’s textures, the same one I used for Alice’s Adventures.

Some of the Easter elements I brought in were discarded and replaced but not before I’d worked on them quite substantially — all good experience and not a waste of time!

These rabbits looked best in the Darken mode. But this meant the egg was far from clear. I used the Lasso Tool to select it (the Magnetic Tool is never accurate enough unless you are working with sharply defined objects) and created a new layer for the egg alone. This layer I left in its Normal state and placed it on top of the original egg. It needed touching up with the Brush and Clone Stamp Tools before I was satisfied.

The Darken mode also meant that the lower part of the right-hand rabbit had taken on the green of the background. This needed adjustment which I did by tracing the exact shape of the offending part with the Lasso Tool.  I moved to the background image and chose a lighter area in the ‘sky’ to create a new layer of the rabbit-leg shape. I left it in a Normal state and placed it behind the rabbit. Several colour adjustments were needed until the rabbit’s nether regions matched the rest of his body!

The Multiply mode was ideal for the hot air balloon but left the chicks in the basket more green than yellow. Mind you, one could argue that would be appropriate as surely the poor little blighters would be air sick! I used the same technique on them as I did on the egg to bring their yellow feathers back to life.

This left me with the bottom half of the balloon which, like the chicks and the rabbit, had taken on too much of the background to match up with the rest of the balloon. I used the same procedure as with the rabbit’s nether regions to bring it up to scratch.

I had originally planned to use the Easter greeting on the hot air balloon graphic at the top of the image but it failed to make the impact I had envisaged so I made a type layer instead with a font called Great Vibes.

The last touch was using the graphic above by removing its border and background and applying a ‘drop shadow’ and ‘bevel and emboss’ effect.

May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design

May Easter Joy Attend You © First Night Design
Available as Posters, Cards, and Prints

Available at the following galleries:
Redbubble
Crated
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK
Fine Art America
Fine Art England

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Well now, boys and girls, are you sitting comfortably? Then I’ll begin.

Once upon a time, there was a little English shepherdess who lost all her sheep.

Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep
And doesn’t know where to find them.
Leave them alone and they’ll come home,
Bringing their tails behind them.
Little Bo Peep fell fast asleep
And dreamt she heard them bleating,
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they were all still fleeting.
Then up she took her little crook
Determined for to find them.
She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they left their tails behind them.
It happened one day, as Bo Peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails side by side
All hung on a tree to dry.
She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
And over the hillocks went rambling,
And tried what she could,
As a shepherdess should,
To tack again each to its lambkin.

If you imagine the tale ends there, oh, my dears, think again!

The Lady of the Manor, Evangelina, is trying to help Little Bo Peep and goes searching far and wide across her husband’s estate, humming a tuneless little ditty to herself.  Evangelina is tone-deaf, a failing her husband tries to ignore when she attempts to entertain guests at one of their sumptuous parties.

“Oh, how charming,” exclaims Evangelina on discovering one of the rams beside her favourite tree. “Come here, my little thing. I wish to stroke you,” she says, pointing a finger at him in an imperious manner.

The ram, Josiah, is feeling miserable for he has had a frustrating morning trying to persuade his sweetheart, Minty, to give him the attention he thinks he deserves. ‘I’m not your little thing,’ he thinks, glaring at Evangelina. ‘I belong to Bo Peep, if anyone, and I very much want to belong to Minty.  So there.’

His mood is not helped by this stranger standing in his shadow and he snaps. Launching himself at her, he follows his head butt with a bite of her thumb.

The word that explodes from Evangelina’s lips has hitherto only been uttered by the workers in the meadows on whom she has so often spied, intrigued and excited by the shape of their bodies and the curve of their muscles, of which her husband has none.

It is not until after Little Bo Peep has found the tails and replaced them on her lambkins, that the Lady of the Manor is found by one Snotty Smethwick, a cow-hand on the estate.  He carries her almost lifeless body to the main house where the housekeeper takes it upon herself to tend to her mistress.  Little Bo Peep is called upon to mix up one of her refreshing potions to revive Evangelina.

It is too late. That evening, the Lady of the Manor succumbs to the Hereafter.

There is much weeping and wailing on the estate. A lavish funeral takes place, after which life goes on much as it always has.  Except for one thing.

The Lord of the Manor falls in love with Little Bo Peep and marries her.  Their happiness is short-lived.  Snotty Smethwick, who was secretly in love with the Lady of the Manor, is highly suspicious and decides that the ram is not to blame, rather that Little Bo Peep’s potion had been laced with poison.

One thing leads to another until the new Lady of the Manor is charged with murder and imprisoned at Newgate.

Little Bo Peep dies of heartbreak and starvation.

Some say it was the housekeeper who did the dirty deed. Only Josiah knew the truth for he died not long after of a nasty disease and was mourned by Minty alone, and extravagantly at that.

© Sarah Vernon

Ingredients for Pastoral Lady

The Result

Ram and tree: The Graphics Fairy
Georgian lady: Vintage Stock Art
Background: EKDuncan @ Deviant Art

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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