You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Oscar Wilde’ tag.


“A writer is someone who has taught his mind to misbehave.” — Oscar Wilde, Irish, writer, playwright, novelist, essayist, poet

Source: “A writer is someone who has taught his mind to…” – Art of Quotation

Advertisements

Thousands of women died because of the highly flammable nature of crinoline skirts. (Photo: WELLCOME LIBRARY, LONDON/CC BY 4.0)

As a literary genius and master of wit, Oscar Wilde has fascinated the world since he first started writing. There is one area of his life, however, which remained in obscurity until the 1940s, and which continues to be a mystery: The horrifying death of his half-sisters.

The existence of Emily and Mary Wilde, the illegitimate daughters of Sir William Wilde, was kept hidden from…

Source: The Strange Secret Behind the Tragic Deaths of Oscar Wilde’s Half-Sisters | Atlas Obscura


By James Abbott McNeill Whistler - The Yorck Project: 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei. DVD-ROM, 2002. ISBN 3936122202. Distributed by DIRECTMEDIA Publishing GmbH., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=160242

Self-Portrait by James Abbott McNeill Whistler [Wikipedia]

Oscar Wilde: “I wish I had said that.”
Whistler: “You will, Oscar, you will.”
James McNeill Whistler

Is it apocryphal! To find out more about this very famous quote, click here.

Related

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Lord Alfred Douglas, nicknamed Bosie, was a young aristocrat and poet, the youngest son of the Marquess of Queensberry. He looked like an angel: fragile, with a very pale complexion, blonde hair and blue eyes, but often appearances can be deceptive and this case was no exception. The story of his relationship with Wilde began in 1892. Bosies’s  cousin, Lionel Johnson, had lent him a  copy of The Picture of Dorian Gray“, and after reading it  fourteen times in a row” he wished to be introduced to the author and so at the end of June 1891 Lionel Johnson accompanied his cousin in Tite Street and introduced him to Oscar Wilde. At the end of June 1892 Douglas needed Oscar’s help, because he was being blackmailed. Oscar, thanks to his lawyer George Lewis, solved all and since then they started to date and by the end of December 1893 they had become inseparable. The rumors about their lives ran all over London. The writer had little desire to…

Source: My lover, Lord Alfred Douglas.


Thanksgiving Hideaway © Sarah Vernon

Thanksgiving Hideaway © Sarah Vernon

Original photograph by Mr FND adapted in Photoshop for Thanksgiving with textures from 2 Lil’ Owls and Grand Hotel monogram from The Graphics Fairy.


“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one’s own relations.”
Oscar Wilde, A Woman of No Importance


 

Photography Prints


“I celebrated Thanksgiving in an old-fashioned way. I invited everyone in my neighborhood to my house, we had an enormous feast, and then I killed them and took their land.”
Jon Stewart


Available at the following galleries:
Redbubble
Crated
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK
Fine Art America
Fine Art England

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Originally posted on WildeTimes.net.

A Private View at the Royal Academy, with captions pointing out Anthony Trollope, Prime Minister William Gladstone, Robert Browning, the Countess of Lonsdale, Lord Leighton, Lillie Langtry, Oscar Wilde, Ellen Terry and Henry Irving, and John Everett Millais

The opening of the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London on the first Monday in May marked the beginning of ‘the Season’ for the élite of Victorian Society. This set in play three hectic months of balls, concerts, dinner parties, operas, horse riding in Hyde Park, the Derby and races at Royal Ascot, the Henley Royal Regatta and cricket at Lord’s. Young women pinned their hopes on getting engaged before the debutante balls, parties and concerts came to an end on 12 August, when fashionable people abandoned London and headed north to shoot grouse, partridges and pheasants as a prelude to fox-hunting.Whatever Oscar Wilde may have thought of fox-hunting (“the unspeakable in full pursuit of the uneatable” as he called it in A Woman of No Importance), his social success is reflected in his appearance at the Royal Academy’s Private Viewing day in May 1881, an invitation-only event. At only 26 years of age, Wilde was a celebrity moving in the best circles, despite being an Irishman in xenophobic London.Wilde’s achievement is remarkable because in 1881 he had little writing to his name (his first and largely forgotten play, Vera, and a volume of poetry), yet he had made himself conspicuous enough as…

via The Apostle of the beautiful and the Season | WildeTimes.net.


Originally posted on e-Tinkerbell.

Whenever I think about Constance Lloyd  Wilde, and what she had to endure, all alone in an age when  it was important to be “earnest”, respectable and have the sense of decorum, I cannot help but wonder: what was her marriage like? When did she understand about her husband’s sexual behaviour? How did she feel? Let’s start from the beginning.

As far as we know, Constance first met Wilde at a party given by Lady Wilde for her two sons at Merrion Square in Dublin on 6 June 1881. Constance was a passionate reader of poetry and discovered soon that Wilde shared with her a deep admiration for Keats. On the following day, she wrote to her brother Otho:

“O. W. came yesterday at about 5.30 (by which time I was shaking with fright!) and stayed for half an hour, begged me to come and see his mother again soon…. I can’t help liking him, because when he’s talking to me alone he’s never a bit affected, and speaks naturally, excepting that he uses better language than most people.”

The following months, she slowly grew attached to him, but her parents were not that impressed by Wilde’s extravagance and furthermore, the eccentricities of his parents were notorious.  Somebody asserts that Wilde was more interested in her family ‘s wealth than Constance herself, but some others, like Ann Clark Amor, believe that…

via My husband, Oscar Wilde. | e-Tinkerbell.


“To feel the affection that comes from those whom we do not know … widens out the boundaries of our being, and unites all living things.”

Since our cave-dwelling days, the question of why we make art and why we enjoy it has haunted us as a perennial specter of the human experience. For Leo Tolstoy, it was about the transference of “emotional infectiousness”; for Jeanette Winterson, about “active surrender”; for Oscar Wilde, about cultivating a “temperament of receptivity.”

That question is what beloved Chilean poet and Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda answers with unparalleled elegance in a short essay from the early 1950s titled “Childhood and Poetry,” found in the altogether enchanting collection Neruda and Vallejo (public library).

Neruda relays an anecdote from his childhood that profoundly influenced not only his poetry but also…

via The Hand Through the Fence: Pablo Neruda on What a Childhood Encounter Taught Him About Writing and Why We Make Art | Brain Pickings.


Update 21-10-14: Alas, the Wilde family have very strict control of their famous forebear’s work and this wonderful image has not been allowed so is no longer for sale at my Zazzle vintage store.

Oscar Wilde by Napoleon Sarony 1882 © First Night Vintage

Oscar Wilde by Napoleon Sarony 1882 

New to my vintage store on Zazzle is this glorious sepia photograph of the inimitable Oscar Wilde. It was taken in 1882 by Napoleon Sarony and hangs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I was able to use it as the image is in the public domain on Wikimedia.


“Ah, every day dear Herbert becomes de plus en plus Oscarié. It is a wonderful case of nature imitating art.” Wilde commenting on actor-manager Herbert Beerbohm Tree’s unwitting acquisition of certain on-stage character traits in a Wilde play in his off-stage life.


Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


First Night Design

Absinthe is likely to become all the rage again now that Pernod has reintroduced the drink using its original 1805 formula.  Should you have been in company with the likes of Charles Baudelaire, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec or Oscar Wilde, it would have been de rigeur. Many European countries have banned it at one time or another  because the enticing green liquid is highly intoxicating and considered hallucinogenic. The one exception where banning was concerned is Spain.  Spain has never banned the spirit. Yes, it’s a spirit, not a liqueur, as I learned today.

The French coined the term la fée verte (‘the green lady’ or ‘green fairy’), and, while its known associations have most often been with the likes of Wilde and Lautrec, it is described on the Absinthe 101 site as ‘especially democratic. In the 1840s…

View original post 233 more words


Absinthe is likely to become all the rage again now that Pernod has reintroduced the drink using its original 1805 formula.  Should you have been in company with the likes of Charles Baudelaire, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec or Oscar Wilde, it would have been de rigeur. Many European countries have banned it at one time or another  because the enticing green liquid is highly intoxicating and considered hallucinogenic. The one exception where banning was concerned is Spain.  Spain has never banned the spirit. Yes, it’s a spirit, not a liqueur, as I learned today.

The French coined the term la fée verte (‘the green lady’ or ‘green fairy’), and, while its known associations have most often been with the likes of Wilde and Lautrec, it is described on the Absinthe 101 site as ‘especially democratic. In the 1840s, French soldiers were given absinthe as a field treatment for malaria’.  The medicinal and mind-altering aspects are said to come from the inclusion of the herb Wormwood. Latterly, it became associated with appallingly drunken behaviour and scandal, hence the reason for it being banned.

For more on the history of Absinthe, it is well worth visiting Absinthe 101.

I ask you, who could resist a drink that can entail such beautiful trappings as the fontaine pictured below?

Absinthe fontaine in a classic design [Wikimedia]

Absinthe fontaine in a classic design [Wikimedia]

I leave you with one thought and that is that Absinthe Makes the Heart Grow Fonder.  I assumed this was an ‘old chestnut’ but the only reference I can find is to a line spoken in an episode of Californication that was thus entitled.  It does sound rather like Oscar.  Does anyone know of an earlier use?

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

P.S. I’ve just realised that today in 1900, Oscar Wilde died. He was a stripling of 46.


It may be termed a Messenger or Courier bag by Zazzle but it’s just the right size for a handbag, as far as I’m concerned.  The latter can never be too capacious!

My mother taught me never to say ‘handbag’, only ‘bag’, because she was upper class and brought up to use what would later be called U and non-U English, with ‘U’ standing for upper.  These terms were memorably laid out in Nancy Mitford‘s  Noblesse Oblige, which created considerable discussion in the newspapers of the mid-1950s.

Where handbags are concerned, I am reminded, of course, of the famous line spoken by Lady Augusta Bracknell in Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest.  Looked at from an upper-class perspective, I have always thought that the character was commenting not on the fact that Ernest, when a baby, had been found in a bag — “A somewhat large… black… leather handbag with handles…” — at Victoria Station, so much as at the very non-U ‘handbag’!

I cannot finish this post about language and class — with a rather nice bag attached! — without giving you Sir John Betjeman‘s How to Get on in Society, where the poet gives his response to the debate by using ‘non-U’ words throughout.   My brother and I often used to tease my mother by using as many ‘non-U’ words as we could in any given conversation because we knew it would drive her crazy.  Actually, she was crazy.  She was a manic-depressive.  Oh, I’m sorry, they call it bi-polar these days.  I’m sure that were she still alive she would be saying that ‘bi-polar’ was ‘terribly common’, a very ‘non-U’ word!

How to Get on in Society

Phone for the fish knives, Norman
As cook is a little unnerved;
You kiddies have crumpled the serviettes
And I must have things daintily served.

Are the requisites all in the toilet?
The frills round the cutlets can wait
Till the girl has replenished the cruets
And switched on the logs in the grate.

It’s ever so close in the lounge dear,
But the vestibule’s comfy for tea
And Howard is riding on horseback
So do come and take some with me

Now here is a fork for your pastries
And do use the couch for your feet;
I know that I wanted to ask you —
Is trifle sufficient for sweet?

Milk and then just as it comes dear?
I’m afraid the preserve’s full of stones;
Beg pardon, I’m soiling the doilies
With afternoon tea-cakes and scones.

Be warned, social climbers! When Noblesse Oblige, subtitled An Enquiry into the Identifiable Characteristics of the English Aristocracy, was published in 1956, The Times Literary Supplement said:

‘This is a jolly, ephemeral book . . . Its fashionable conclusions are, of course, impermanent; and unborn social climbers will find it no more reliable as a guide, than the Space Traveller would find an Edwardian Bradshaw* – whose inoperative charm it none the less entertainingly shares.”

(I’ve just done a spell-check and WordPress suggested it would be better to use ‘enough’ instead of ‘sufficient’ in Betjeman’s poem!)

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

*Train timetable

TRANSLATE

Award-Free Blog

About Me

about.me

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 15,289 other followers

Archives

Categories

Artists 4 Peace

Twitter

FND on Twitter

Facebook

FND on Facebook

YesterdayAfter

© Sarah Vernon and First Night Design 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Sarah Vernon and First Night Design with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Taylor Revert

An anything-and-everything blog from life's number one fan

Random Facts in History

History is complex, massive, and full of strange events and coincidences. Learn with me as I hunt those out and bring them into the light.

Life with an Illness

*Tips and tricks on how to get through life when you have a chronic illness*

The poor side of life

Exposing the unfair treatment of jobseekers, the horrors of Universal Credit, unfair sanctions and heinous treatment of claimants at Ashton under Lyne Jobcentre.

For the Love of Art

Create, Explore, and Discover, Every Day.

Politics and Insights

Public interest issues, policy, equality, human rights, social science

IWtheatre

Supporting the rich amateur theatre scene on the Isle of Wight

Robin Hoskyns Nature Photography - Blog

Images and stories of nature, science and conservation.

Sarah Ditum

Writing, etc.

%d bloggers like this: