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MAXIM GORKY 28 March 1868—16 June 1936

‘You must write for children the same way you write for adults, only better.’

‘A good man can be stupid and still be good. But a bad man must have brains.’

‘Lies are the religion of slaves and masters. Truth is the god of the free man.’
Lower Depths, And Other Plays

‘You will not drown the truth in seas of blood.’

‘Writers build castles in the air, the reader lives inside, and the publisher inns the rent.’


My Childhood

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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Reblogged from The Bright Old Oak

princess

Recognised as the first modern novel in history, “La Princesse de Clèves” has ridden a rollercoaster in terms of popularity and fame ever since its first publication in anonymous form in March 1678. Marie-Madeleine Pioche de La Vergne, countess of La Fayette, simply known as Madame de La Fayette was a 28 year-old married woman when she saw her first work published in Paris. Following her début with “La Princesse de Montpensier”, the first volume of the romance “Zaïde” would be published seven years later, with a second volume following in 1671. Despite not having been spared any negative criticism, most works by La Fayette saw an overall interest and reception. The public was enchanted by her way of telling stories, as they would often remind the reader of contemporary life:fictional characters would often match with the reality of that time, attracting readers and turning her works into a first type of realist novels. There is no doubt that her 1678 book “La Princesse de Clèves” would be her greatest hit. Its theme and topics are so timeless we cannot help but wonder how readers reacted to the main storyline through the centuries. In fact, playwright Honoré de Balzac’s 1835 “Le Lys dans la Vallée” presents very similar circumstances to La Fayette’s novel in terms of love and relationships.

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Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Image: Douglas Adams, © 2008 Michael Hughes, free licence.

Image: Douglas Adams, © 2008 Michael Hughes, free licence

Reblogged from Interesting Literature

Which classic novels were all written within a month? And which writer would take all his clothes off as a way of coping with writer’s block? We’re here to inspire you in your writing quest whether you’re taking part in NaNoWriMo or merely trying to complete (nay, perhaps start) a writing project.

This month, many people are taking part in NaNoWriMo, or ‘National Novel Writing Month’, which takes place every November. The idea is to write a novel – to start one if not to complete it – by writing 50,000 words across the month of November. Here at Interesting Literature we thought we’d offer some support for those undertaking NaNoWriMo by showing how even famous and established novelists have had to cope with writer’s block, deadlines, and writing quickly.

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I’ve fallen by the wayside when it comes to this year’s #NaNoWriMo because of personal circumstances, but if you’re hitting a low as  the finishing line looms over the horizon, you will either be encouraged by Interesting Literature‘s post and believe that even if you have fallen behind in your word count, it is just possible you might be able to reach 50k words by the end of the month, or you will feel small, insignificant and hopeless!  It’s the way yer look at it!

Personally, the post gives me hope that even if my three and a half-days’ worth amounts to very little, I will be able to harness the energy and focus to make up for it and it doesn’t matter whether it’s December or January or some other point in the future; after all, the whole idea is to complete a novel (ok, mine’s a memoir but you get my drift). Good night and good luck!

Comfort in a Cotton Frock Day 1
Comfort in a Cotton Frock Day 2
Comfort in a Cotton Frock Day 3

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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