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From the archive 19-11-13

Oh, what fun I have had creating this collage! It has been a while since I’ve experimented with my various pieces of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Alice’s Adventures Throug…

Source: Newly-minted Alice: Collage | First Night Design

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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In 1865, a Victorian mathematician wrote a fairy tale that would go on to live parallel lives as one of the world’s most beloved children’s books and a modernist masterwork of philosophy that mushrooms its yield of wisdom with each reading — one of humanity’s very few works, alongside perhaps Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man, which subtly and seamlessly fuse art, science, and philosophy.

Nearly a century later, in a 1961 lecture titled “Where Do We Go from Here,” Marcel Duchamp prophesied that..

Source: Salvador Dalí’s Rare 1969 Illustrations for “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” Rediscovered and Resurrected – Brain Pickings


FROM THE ARCHIVE 29th April 2015
This is the first of an occasional series highlighting Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland —  2015 marks 150 years since the book was…

Source: First Night Design | Alice is At It Again! #1 | First Night Design


Alice in Wonderland Pillow
Alice in Wonderland Pillow


“It’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.”

Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland


Alice in Wonderland Pillows
Alice in Wonderland Pillows


“If everybody minded their own business, the world would go around a great deal faster than it does.”
Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland


Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Stunning literary find: under the floorboards of a room at Christchurch College, Oxford, an electrician has found a manuscript thought to have been written by ‘Lewis Carroll’ (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). Some of it is hard to decipher and it’s clearly incomplete. Here’s one passage:

“Come in,’ said a woman in a loud voice.
Alice walked in to a large room at the Compartment of Edification.
Sitting in front of her, staring into the middle distance was the Blue Queen.
‘How old are you?’ said the Blue Queen.
‘I’m seven years old,’ said Alice politely.
Sitting next to the Queen was the Gibblet.
‘Seven?’ said the Gibblet, ‘Seven? Test her.’
‘Test her,’ said…

Source: Michael Rosen


For my second post to commemorate the publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland 150 years ago, I give you ArtLark’s article on Carroll and his photography. See Alice is at it Again #1 here. The title of this post has no connection to Lewis Carroll and his enchanting character but to the song by Noël Coward, which was the first thing that sprang to mind when I wrote that first post!


Originally posted on A R T L▼R K.

On the 4th of July 1865, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was published in London. Written by Victorian author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832-1898) under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, author, mathematician and Oxford don, this fantasy novel has since made him famous all over the world. Less known is the fact that Dodgson was also an avid and early practitioner of photography. He took it up in 1856, first under the influence of his uncle Skeffington Lutwidge, and later, his Oxford friend Reginald Southey.

In that first year, he made about 2,700 photographs, the last of which he finished in 1880. Half of these are photographic portraits of children, predominantly girls, while 30 percent are of adults and families. Overall, Dodgson produced a selection of self-portraits, group photographs, still lifes, landscapes, pictures of works of art, as well as featuring literary narratives and skeletons (including that of an anteater) and other props for anatomical studies. He even made a portrait of the Dodgson family doll, Tim. The majority of his surviving photos are in American collections, and 407 of those are at the Princeton University Library, which published a comprehensive album of them in 2002.

The incipient stage of photographic tools and techniques in the late 19th century gave Dodgson the inspiration for the imaginative…

via Alice in Wonderland and Photography | A R T L▼R K.


‘Well! I’ve often seen a cat without a grin,’ thought Alice; ‘but a grin without a cat! It’s the most curious thing I ever saw in my life!’


The Alice Collection: The Cheshire Cat Letterhead
The Alice Collection: The Cheshire Cat Letterhead

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass (Bantam Classics)

Available at the following galleries:
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


This is the first of an occasional series highlighting Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland —  2015 marks 150 years since the book was first published.

The White Rabbit Note Book
The White Rabbit Note Book

Interesting fact: You might not know it but although Mock Turtle soup sounds like an invention by Carroll, it was actually a popular Victorian dish, which was invented as a poor man’s version of green turtle soup. According to Oliver Lansley in The Guardian, it consisted of the brains, head and hoof of a calf. Mmm, not sure I like the sound of it but it’s probably delicious!

The Alice Collection: Alice Telescoping Pack Of Chubby Business Cards
The Alice Collection: Alice Telescoping Pack Of Chubby Business Cards

The title of this post has no connection to Lewis Carroll and his enchanting character but the song by Noël Coward was the first thing that sprang to mind!

Alice is At It Again! music & lyrics by Noël Coward

In a dear little village,
Remote and obscure
A beautiful maiden resided.
As to whether or not
Her intentions were pure,
Opinions were sharply divided.
She loved to lie
Out ‘neath the darkening sky,
And allow the night breeze
To entrance her,
She whispered her dreams
To the birds flying by
But seldom received any answer.

Over the field and along the lane
Gentle Alice would love to stray.
When it came to the end of the day,
She would wander away,
Unheeding.
Dreaming her innocent dreams she strode,
Quite unaffected by heat or cold,
Frequently freckled or soaked with rain,
Alice was out in the lane.

Who she met there
Every day
Was a question
Answered by none,
But she’d get there,
And she’d stay there,
‘Til whatever she did
Was undoubtedly done.

Over the field and along the lane
Both her parents would call in vain,
Sadly, sorrowfully, they’d complain,
‘Alice is at it again.’

Although that dear little village,
Surrounded by trees,
Had neither a school, nor a college,
Gentle Alice acquired
From the birds and the bees,
Some exceedingly practical knowledge.
The curious secrets that nature revealed,
She refused to allow to upset her,
But she thought,
When observing the beasts of the field,
That things might have been organised better.

Over the field and along the lane,
Gentle Alice would make up
And take up
Her stand.
The road was not exactly arterial,
But it led to a town nearby,
Where quite a lot of masculine material
Caught her rolling eye.

She was ready to hitchhike,
Cadillac or motorbike,
She wasn’t proud or choosy.
All she
Was aiming to be
Was a pinked-up,
Minked-up,
Fly-by-night floozy.

When old Rogers
Gave her pearls as large as
Nuts on a chestnut tree,
All she’d say was
‘Fiddle-di-dee!
The wages of sin will be the death of me!’

Over the field and along the lane,
Gentle Alice’s parents
Would wait,
Hand in hand.
Her dear old white-headed mother,
Wistfully sipping champagne,
Said ‘We’ve spoiled our child,
Spared the rod.
Open up the caviar and say “Thank God!”
We’ve got no cause to complain!
Alice is at it again!’

Available at the following galleries:
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, “and what is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations?’

So she was considering, in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” (when she thought it over afterwards it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but, when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

Related articles

Oh, what fun I have had creating this collage! It has been a while since I’ve experimented with my various pieces of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Alice’s Adventures Through the Looking Glass ephemera and it’s been inspiring, satisfying and extremely therapeutic. A life in chaos, as mine is now, lends itself to thoughts of childhood in which Lewis Carroll’s books and verses played an invaluable part in making me feel safe. Perhaps that’s ironic considering her topsy-turvy experiences.

A background from Kerstin Frank, whose textures are works of art in themselves, was an exquisite starting point. The Alician elements are taken from a set of Carreras cigarette cards, which I bought some years ago at an antiques fair in Marlborough, Wiltshire, and have treasured ever since. Overlaying the background is a facsimile page from one of my 19th century copies of the Alice books (I can’t lay my hands on them at the moment to check the publication date), which shows Carroll’s original, handwritten first page of his story, which was then titled Alice’s Adventures Underground.  My great-grandmother started a tale in old age in which she wrote her own version called Alice’s Adventures on The Underground! It is an intriguing premise and I’ve often thought I should carry on with the idea.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Alice In Wonderland | Assemblage Art

Reblogged from Messie Jessie.

Alice in Wonderland Art Assemblage

Alice in Wonderland © Messie Jessie

It’s another busy week, I’ve got my niece for the week doing her work experience with me, which I’ve been looking forward to.  She’s studying A Level art and is wanting to attend university this year studying art and then moving into art therapy.  She wants to work with children and adults with learning difficulties.  An area I’ve really enjoyed teaching in.

Anyway back to the pictures, last week I found two small compact little books and thought they would suit Alice in Wonderland because of their small size. These pics are of the first little assemblage I’ve done with the books.  Hopefully I’ll finish the other one tomorrow.

Read more

Sue Griffiths, the talented lady behind Messie Jessie, produces the most exquisite art assemblage pieces, often based on classic literature whether Gone with the Wind, Little Women or Wuthering Heights.  Take a look — you’ll be enchanted.

I envy her dexterity for had my fingers still been working properly, art assemblage is  a craft I would have relished. As a child and a teenager, I was constantly busy making all manner of things which I hoped to sell. I covered notebooks in corduroy, baked clay adornments for necklaces or produced miniature theatres out of old cardboard.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


The Lion and the Unicorn Cards
The Lion and the Unicorn Cards by FirstNightDesign
 

This beautiful illustration of the lion and the unicorn as in Lewis Carroll‘s Alice Through the Looking Glass is not, I have to confess, my work.   I have to thank Mr FND for the use thereof!  It is now available on my Zazzle store as a greeting card (above) and a postcard (below), with more products to come.  Coming soon will be t-shirts featuring the illustration—perfect Christmas and other holiday presents for your kids.

Each includes one verse from Carroll’s ditty of The Lion and the Unicorn:

The Lion and the Unicorn were fighting for the crown:
The Lion beat the Unicorn all round the town.
Some gave them white bread, some gave them brown:
Some gave them plum-cake and drummed them out of town.

The Lion and the Unicorn
The Lion and the Unicorn by FirstNightDesign
 

Take care and keep laughing!  And I hope those of you who celebrate Thanksgiving had a sublime time on Thursday.

Sarah

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