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Size: Vinyl Wrapped Flask, 6 oz.

Be prepared and discreet with a custom Liquid Courage™ flask. A unique gift that’s perfect for weddings, birthdays, and special events!

  • Dimensions: 3.75″l x 4.5″w x 1″d; 6 oz.
  • Material: Stainless steel flask with attached screw top lid
  • Printed on high-quality vinyl that is securely wrapped
  • Durable, water and fade resistant
  • Hand wash with warm water
  • Handmade in USA

Source: Decorated Valentine Fan Hip Flask | Zazzle

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Thank you all so much for commenting on my Rose in Snow post and giving me the confidence to upload the piece to my galleries. I made one change, which was to ensure the rose itself covered the whole area so that no background green is showing. I like it better this way.

A Burgundy Rose in Snow Flask
A Burgundy Rose in Snow Flask by FirstNightDesign
A Burgundy Rose in Snow Throw Pillow
A Burgundy Rose in Snow Throw Pillow by FirstNightDesign

A Burgundy Rose in Snow Card
A Burgundy Rose in Snow Card by FirstNightDesign

A Burgundy Rose in Snow Postage
A Burgundy Rose in Snow Postage by FirstNightDesign

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Paul-François Quinsac (1858–1929) was a French artist who specialised in mythological and allegorical subjects, figures and landscapes.

His painting A Beauty in Violet (1909) was the perfect backdrop to create a faux-Victorian advertisement with vintage elements from The Graphics Fairy, including an intricate twirl for a headpiece, embellished with one of my embossed flowers that I created in the early days.

Déjeuner de Luxe Flask
Déjeuner de Luxe Flask by FirstNightDesign

Déjeuner de Luxe Postcard
Déjeuner de Luxe Postcard by FirstNightDesign

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


La Toilette de Vénus by François Boucher [Wikimedia]

I had forgotten about Wet Magic until I sold a postcard of it yesterday. It was one of my first adaptations of a classic piece, in this instance La Toilette de Vénus by François Boucher [1703-1770] which can be seen at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It took me days — my Photoshop skills were almost non-existent at the time — and days and days. The idea of switching her from right to left and turning her into a mermaid came from my love of E Nesbit’s children’s books and specifically Wet Magic in which her protagonists save a mermaid from the circus, and much else besides.

Extract from Wet Magic in which Nesbit quotes John Milton:

‘Now, Francis,” [Mavis] called. And Francis came slowly with his thumb in The Water Babies. It was nearly dark by now, but Mavis had lighted the four dolls’ house candles in the gilt candlesticks and set them on the table round the aquarium.”Look through the side,” she said; “isn’t it ripping?””Why,” said Francis slowly, “you’ve got water in it–and real anemones! Where on earth…?””Not real,” said Mavis. “I wish they were; they’re only dahlias. But it does look pretty, doesn’t it?””It’s like Fairyland,” said Kathleen, and Bernard added, “I am glad you bought it.””It just shows what it will be like when we do get the sea creatures,” said Mavis. “Oh, Francis, you do like it, don’t you?””Oh, I like it all right,” he answered, pressing his nose against the thick glass, “but I wanted it to be waving weeds and mysterious wetness like the Sabrina picture.”The other three glanced at the picture which hung over the mantel piece–Sabrina and the water-nymphs, drifting along among the waterweeds and water-lilies. There were words under the picture, and Francis dreamily began to say them:–“Sabrina fair,
Listen where thou art sitting.
Under the glassy green, translucent wave…
In twisted braids of lilies knitting
The loose train of thine amber-dropping hair…”‘
1024px-François_Boucher_-_La_Marquise_de_Pompadour

La marquise de Pompadour by François Boucher [Wikimedia]

And why Madame de Pompadour? Louis XV’s famous mistress commissioned La Toilette de Vénus for the boudoir at her château near Paris. She was a devotee of the artist and his patroness from 1747 until she died in 1764. According to the metmuseum, ‘…she had acted the title role in a play, staged at Versailles, called “The Toilet of Venus,” and while this is not a portrait, a flattering allusion may have been intended.’ Visit Last Post to read several fascinating articles about Madame de Pompadour by Pippa Rathborne.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


I thought I’d jump on the bandwagon and create some commemorative gifts for the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, which took place on 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st June, 1815.

Related

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Available at the following galleries:
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


I recently sold a couple of Birdcage Blossom postcards. Which was nice! And I thought I’d show you some of the other products with the design as suggestions for Christmas.

Birdcage Blossom 
Birdcage Blossom Hip Flasks

Birdcage Blossom
Birdcage Blossom Wrapping Paper

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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