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“With color one obtains an energy that seems to stem from witchcraft.” — Henri Matisse, French, painter, printmaker

Source: “With color one obtains an energy that seems to stem from witchcraft.” – Art of Quotation


ORIGINALLY POSTED ON The Genealogy of Style.

Drawings, and Sketches by Henri Matisse

Drawings, and Sketches by Henri Matisse

One may well ask, as Henri Matisse was best known for his models being clad in Moroccan or Parisian attire, rather then in Romanian ethnic dress or better still, not clad at all… So, why a Romanian Blouse, out of the blue?

Looking at some of Matisses’s earlier works one could discern the idea in the blouse of the 1939 dancer “Une danseuse au repos”, showing a seated woman wearing a Romanian blouse. Likewise, another of Matisse’s paintings, “Still Life with sleeping woman” , now in the collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC . The sitter is a woman wearing an embroidered long-sleeve blouse, decorated on the upper part of the sleeve similarly to the Romanian blouses. An even earlier version, with prevailing greens appears in 1937. So, from these and other examples, one could suggest unequivocally, that the idea was not new in the artist’s mind. However, what was new on this occasion, in 1940, was that the Romanian Blouse  had become central to the subject, forcing it on ‘front stage’ and giving it a specific, named identity. The canvas must have been discussed, if not prompted by the visit of an old friend the Romanian painter Theodor Pallady (1871-1956), whose portrait was…

Source: A Glimmer of Optimism | The Genealogy of Style.


We found my glasses: they had been inadvertently kicked under the sofa!

In other news, it’s taking an age to catch up with my new followers on here and Twitter. I may just have to let it all go. Needless to say, most of the Twitter followers have unfollowed because I didn’t follow back, which simply proves they’re only interested in numbers and not my work. Plus ca change.

In further news, I still hate Windows computers.

I had no time to put together a post for today so here’s another one of Stuart’s delightful articles.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah x

stuartshieldgardendesign

Portrait_of_Henri_Matisse_1933_May_20Matissetoits1024px-Self-portrait_in_studio_by_André_DerainGeorges_Braque,_1906,_L'Olivier_près_de_l'Estaque_(The_Olive_tree_near_l'Estaque)1920px-Rousseau-Hungry-LionMatisse-LuxeMatisse-Woman-with-a-HatLes_Fauves,_Exhibition_at_the_Salon_D'Automne,_from_L'Illustration,_4_November_1905

Matisse_-_Green_LineFauvism is the style of les Fauves (French for “the wild beasts”), a loose group of early twentieth-century Modern artists whose works emphasized painterly qualities and strong colour over the representational or realistic values retained by Impressionism. While Fauvism as a style began around 1900 and continued beyond 1910, the movement as such lasted only a few years, 1904–1908, and had three exhibitions. The leaders of the movement were Henri Matisse and André Derain.

Artists and style

Besides Matisse and Derain, other artists included Albert Marquet, Charles Camoin, Louis Valtat, the Belgian painter Henri Evenepoel, Maurice Marinot, Jean Puy, Maurice de Vlaminck, Henri Manguin, Raoul Dufy, Othon Friesz, Georges Rouault, Jean Metzinger, the Dutch painter Kees van Dongen and Georges Braque (subsequently Picasso’s partner in Cubism).

The paintings of the Fauves were characterized by seemingly wild brush work and strident colours, while their subject matter had a high degree of…

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