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If you read my blog regularly, you can probably guess my thoughts this Bank Holiday!


“It’s time to start living the life you’ve imagined.” ― Henry James

“Toto, I have a feeling we’re not in Kansas Crete anymore.” ― L. Frank Baum

“In the long run, the pessimist may be proved right, but the optimist has a better time on the trip.” — Daniel L. Reardon

“For last year’s words belong to last year’s language
And next year’s words await another voice.
And to make an end is to make a beginning.”
(Little Gidding) ―  T.S. Eliot

“Sometimes losing everything is the only way to begin.”  (The Firebrand Legacy)
T.K. Kiser


Available at the following galleries:
Redbubble
Crated
Zazzle UK
Zazzle US
Fine Art America
Fine Art England
Saatchi Art

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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FROM THE ARCHIVE 13th November 2014

“Give me books, French wine, fruit, fine weather and a little music played out-of-doors by somebody I do not know.” ― John Keats Let joy be unconfined! I have sold a cushion at Redbubble with the V…

Source: First Night Design | “Give me books, French wine, fruit, fine weather and…” | First Night Design


Originally posted on  ღ Vintage Blog.

In 1844 Pierre-Louis Pierson began operating a studio in Paris that specialized in hand-colored daguerreotypes. In 1855 he entered into a partnership with Léopold Ernest and Louis Frédéric Mayer, who also ran a daguerreotype studio. The Mayers had been named “Photographers of His Majesty the Emperor” by Napoleon III the year before Pierson joined them. Although the studios remained at separate addresses, Pierson and the Mayers began to distribute their images under the joint title “Mayer et Pierson,” and together they became the leading society photographers in Paris (source).

Pierre Louis Pierson´s most interesting professional project is the close collaboration he led with Virginia Oldoini, the Countess of Castiglione. She directed Pierre-Louis Pierson to help her create…

via Pierre Louis Pierson (1822 – 1913) – Countess Virginie de Castiglione | ღ Vintage Blog.


Vins Spiritueux, Nectar of the Gods Round Wall Clocks
Vins Spiritueux, Nectar of the Gods Round Wall Clocks from Zazzle

I’ve sold one of these clocks! They’re available in different sizes and also a square shape.


“When I do count the clock that tells the time,
And see the brave day sunk in hideous night;
When I behold the violet past prime,
And sable curls all silver’d o’er with white;
When lofty trees I see barren of leaves
Which erst from heat did canopy the herd,
And summer’s green all girded up in sheaves
Borne on the bier with white and bristly beard,
Then of thy beauty do I question make,
That thou among the wastes of time must go,
Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsake
And die as fast as they see others grow;
And nothing ‘gainst Time’s scythe can make defence
Save breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence.”
William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Available at the following galleries:
Redbubble
Crated
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK
Fine Art America
Fine Art England

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Discreet French Charm

A change of pace to show you this charming vintage French advertising image, presumably to proclaim the delights of Saint Denis (see top of image), which comes from The Graphics Fairy. I enhanced the original and added the almond green border.

Available at the following galleries:
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


 “A revolt against nature: a woman genius”…Octave Mirbeau
Camille Claudel
8 December 1864 – 19 October 1943

Camille Claudel was a French sculptor and artist. Her fascination for clay, stone, and dirt, began when she was a young child, and as she came of age, despite the protestations of her mother, her father supported her to study art. Around 1884, she started working with Auguste Rodin and before long became his lover and confidante. Obviously her family was outraged by the affair.

After 1905, she was afflicted by a mental illness. In the throes of her paranoia, she destroyed much of her work. Today, only 90 pieces exist. She disappeared for long periods of time, which alarmed her family. She came to believe that Rodin had stolen her all her ideas and he would soon kill her. As a result, she hid from the world, locking herself in her workshop to work. In 1913, her brother convinced her to voluntarily enter a psychiatric hospital where she had numerous outbursts. Despite her agitation, whenever engrossed in creating art, she was always…

Read original History and Women.


If you are as devoted as I am to vintage and retro art and have been fortunate enough to encounter The Muscleheaded Blog, you will know what very heaven it is to explore.  In this post he writes about the “Father of Modern Advertising”, Leonetto Cappiello [1875-1942].

Leonetto Cappiello was the premier poster artist of his generation—

He developed a unique and revolutionary style,

…… and his work is as popular today as it was during the height of the Belle Epoque.

It’s very possible that you are already familiar with Leonetto Cappiello’s beautiful art,

……..and weren’t really aware of it.

His work is so synonymous with the whole advertising poster art revolution of the early 1900s ,

….that he is called the “Father of Modern Advertising”.

And while the majority of his best work was…

Read more at The Poster Art of Leonetto Cappiello | The Muscleheaded Blog.


I recently sold a couple of Birdcage Blossom postcards. Which was nice! And I thought I’d show you some of the other products with the design as suggestions for Christmas.

Birdcage Blossom 
Birdcage Blossom Hip Flasks

Birdcage Blossom
Birdcage Blossom Wrapping Paper

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah



“Give me books, French wine, fruit, fine weather and a little music played out-of-doors by somebody I do not know.”
― John Keats


Let joy be unconfined! I have sold a cushion at Redbubble with the Vins Spiritueux design. Do you want to see the tote bag as well? Oh, well, if you insist!

tb,1200x1200,small.2-2


“I cook with wine, sometimes I even add it to the food.”
― W.C. Fields


Design available to buy @

Redbubble
Crated
Zazzle.co.uk
Zazzle.com
Fine Art America
Fine Art England

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


As I’ve just sold another postcard of Birdcage Blossom, I thought you might like to see one of the original posts relating to this collage from two years ago. Whenever I look at it, I find myself amazed that it was me who created it!

First Night Design

Following on from the last post, this is the birdcage image on a pillow.

Background from Astrid’s Artistic Efforts, flowers, birdcage and French typography from The Graphics Fairy.

Take care and keep laughing.

About Sarah & First Night Design

View original post


Originally posted on Country Woman Paints 

Auguste Renoir

Auguste Renoir

I discover so many fascinating things from the bloggers I follow in my reader. And from the ones they link to. Blogger oawritingspoemspaintings” (a new blog to follow!) shared short films of the artists Renoir, Monet and Rodin, live in their studios, that were amazing. I plan to post each of them, beginning with Renoir. He is my favorite artist of the three and I’ve now watched it a dozen times.

French impressionist painter Auguste Renoir (1841-1919) painted despite partial paralysis and cruel rheumatoid arthritis until the end of his life. Painting with his brushes taped to his crippled hand, especially moves me.  To the end of his life, Renoir’s  three sons helped their ill father, who was wheelchair-bound later in life. His children often helped him in his painting, posing for him from the time they were small and later as he grew more disabled, binding his brush to his arthritic hand and with his paints, brushes and palette. Renoir’s wife passed away a few years before his death.

From an NPR interview linked here:

“Renoir had crippling rheumatoid arthritis — at the LACMA exhibit {Los Angeles County Museum of Art}, there’s a flickering black and white film that shows Renoir painting in 1915, despite his…

via French Impressionist Painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir ~ Short Film in Studio.


Selling my namesake is a thing devoutly to be wished, and we’ll ignore the fact that when Hamlet used the phrase, he was talking about suicide! This postcard of the great French actress, Sarah Bernhardt — The Divine Sarah — is winging its way to a customer.


‘My fame had become annoying for my enemies, and a little trying, I confess, for my friends.’ My Double Life: Memoirs of Sarah Bernhardt (1907) Wikiquote

‘Once the curtain is raised, the actor ceases to belong to himself. He belongs to his character, to his author, to his public. He must do the impossible to identify himself with the first, not to betray the second, and not to disappoint the third. And to this end the actor must forget his personality and throw aside his joys and sorrows. He must present the public with the reality of a being who for him is only a fiction. With his own eyes, he must shed the tears of the other. With his own voice, he must groan the anguish of the other. His own heart beats as if it would burst, for it is the other’s heart that beats in his heart. And when he retires from a tragic or dramatic scene, if he has properly rendered his character, he must be panting and exhausted.’ The Art of the Theatre (1925) Wikiquote

‘We ought to hate very rarely, as it is too fatiguing; remain indifferent to a great deal, forgive often and never forget.’ My Double Life: Memoirs of Sarah Bernhardt (1907) Wikiquote


Related

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Ingredients!

Vins Spiritueux, Nectar of the Gods

Mine own

And there you have it. Well, not quite. There were, naturally, many different stages in between during which I twiddled and smoothed, blended and swore. The profanity came thick and fast because my touchpad kept sticking. Dog hairs. They get everywhere. At least that was what my tame computer consultant said last time. But when he showed me the evidence, I told him I couldn’t be absolutely certain that I wasn’t the main culprit as short, white dog hair inside a computer looks suspiciously like short, white human hair.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


The Divine Sarah © First Night Vintage

The Divine Sarah © First Night Vintage

“Life begets life. Energy creates energy.  It is by spending oneself that one becomes rich.”

Throughout last week, I could be seen glued to the front door waiting for a small packet of vintage postcards from my favourite shop in Berlin, Bartko-Reher-OHG, to be pushed through the letterbox and land with a soft thud onto the doormat.  On Friday, it arrived and I couldn’t have been  happier for among the postcards I had bought was this beauty of The Divine Sarah, Sarah Bernhardt, the great French stage actress who lived long enough to appear in some very early silent films (see below).

Yes, ’tis she of the wooden leg who, in a great example of cross-gender casting, played Hamlet, wooden leg an’ all; she who used a coffin as a bed; she who was described as a notorious liar by  Alexandre Dumas, fils and who was once sacked from the Comédie-Française for slapping another actress round the face. She was also said to have had an affair with the Prince of Wales (Edward VII).


Sarah Bernhardt in Queen Elizabeth (1912)

I have no idea of the date of the photograph but it’s clear that my namesake was young at the time.  Since she was born in 1844, I don’t think I would be far wrong if I said it was taken in the late-1860s or early ’70s. Whether it was for a production or simply Mademoiselle Bernhardt at home is a tough call. To our modern eyes, she looks to be ‘in costume’ but that would be to forget that this was how those with money and a healthy social life dressed at the time.  If anyone can shed any light, please comment below as I would love to know more.


Sarah Bernhardt in Daniel (1921)

When I was young and fell in love with the theatre, I wanted to be the late-20th century equivalent of Ellen Terry, to whom I bear a slight resemblance when in profile. Short of that, it was going to be a British version of The Divine Sarah.  As it is, I have to be content with selling their charms!

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

Related articles

Following on from the last post, this is the birdcage image on a pillow.

Background from Astrid’s Artistic Efforts, flowers, birdcage and French typography from The Graphics Fairy.

Take care and keep laughing.

About Sarah & First Night Design

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