You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘exhibition’ tag.


charles-rennie-mackintosh“Every object which you pass from your hand must carry an outspoken mark of individuality, beauty and most exact execution.” Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Glasgow is having a bit of a do this year to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the birth of architect, designer and artist Charles Rennie Mackintosh, one of the city’s favourite…

via The History Girls: Charles Rennie Mackintosh: Making the Glasgow Style by Catherine Hokin


poohatvanda

Long before there was Paddington Bear, Shaun the Sheep and Peppa Pig, there was Winnie the Pooh. For over 90 years, the bear with very little brain and his friends Piglet, Rabbit, Owl, Tigger, Kanga, Roo and Christopher Robin have entertained and enchanted both…

via Exhibition Review: Winnie the Pooh: Exploring a Classic (V&A) | Enough of this Tomfoolery!


Queer British Art at the Tate is a fascinating exhibition, it is more of a history of homosexuality in Britain told through artistic pieces. Some of the exhibits aren’t very queer, until you …

Source: Queer British Art, Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1 | reviewdonkey


I first encountered Vanessa Bell’s work when I was a student at the Courtauld, where I saw A Conversation and Arum Lilies, and fell in love with them. In fact, I haven’t seen that much more of her work since, so went to Dulwich Picture Gallery‘s new exhibition of Bell’s work as soon as I could. Bell is primarily known today as part of…

Source: Exhibition review: Vanessa Bell | Culture and Anarchy


FROM THE ARCHIVE 7 March 2014
What! No elephants? Visitors who read yesterday’s post will know this piece started out with elephants. After adding textures from 2 Lil’ Owls, I played around for some while adding and…

Source: First Night Design | Day at the Exhibition (What! No Heffalumps?)


James Gillray, The life of William-Cobbett, written by himself. : Now you lying varlets you shall see how a plain tale will put you down! / Js. Gillray inv. & fec. Published in London, 29 September 1809 (Lewis Walpole Library).

From The Lewis Walpole Library: James Gillray’s Hogarthian Progresses The Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington, CT, 6 April — 16 September 2016 Curated by Cynthia Roman Sequential narratio…

Source: Exhibition | James Gillray’s Hogarthian Progresses


Originally posted in The New York Times.

Georgia O’Keeffe’s “Lake George (formerly Reflection Seascape)” (1922). Credit All rights reserved, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

If you are a casual fan of Georgia O’Keeffe, you probably think of New Mexico when you think of her. After all, she lived there for decades and avidly explored the landscape in her work and her life, collecting stones and bones and accolades as one of America’s most celebrated painters.

But long before O’Keeffe embedded in the desert, her life included a period in the considerably lusher climes of upstate New York, on Lake George, the glacial Adirondack lake near here where she spent a series of summers — creating scores of paintings — while staying with Alfred Stieglitz, the photographer, art promoter and her eventual husband, whose family kept a small estate there.

Now, for the first time, some five-dozen of those creations have been brought together in an exhibition — “Modern Nature: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George” — at the Hyde Collection, a tiny museum in this modest, well-kept city of about 15,000, an hour north of Albany.

And in an impressive display of upstate pride, the Hyde exhibition, which opened here in June, has already set…

via Georgia O’Keeffe’s Lake George Paintings at Hyde Collection – The New York Times.


One from the archive, an article about the artist John Craxton, taken from the New Statesman.

First Night Design

via The world of private mystery in John Craxton’s paintings.

Islands of edgy light: Galatas (1947)Islands of edgy light: Galatas (1947)

They may not like it but it is the fate of artists, as with all interesting creatures, to be labelled. John Craxton, a friend of Graham Sutherland, Paul Nash and John Piper, has duly been filed under “neo-Romantic”. These were the painters who in the years before the Second World War rediscovered the mystical work of Samuel Palmer and William Blake and reacted to the lowering mood of the times by conjuring up a British Eden of shepherds and overgrown green lanes among billowing hills that could be pulled close like an eiderdown. Craxton refuted the label, but grudgingly accepted a more accurate one: “Arcadian”.

Dark and fecund lands: Llanthony Abbey (1942)Dark and fecund lands: Llanthony Abbey (1942)

This separation from his fellows was not just a question of taxonomy. From 1946 he lived largely in Greece, a place…

View original post 119 more words


A few days ago I received an email from See.me informing me that I had been chosen to receive three free spots on their Times Square (NY) billboard show. My work will be 10 feet (3 meters) tall on the sign. This is quite extraordinary. It’s just a shame I can’t be there to see them in person!

billboard_collage

There’s only two days left to garner likes and, if you wish, create and buy tee-shirts and postcards, but if I get enough points from these activities by you lovely chaps and chappesses to add to the 500 given free, I’m in with a chance of having an image at 200 feet (60 meters) tall. I won’t know where to put meself!

The choice of which three artworks to submit was almost impossible but in the end I went for the three you see below. Now I want to change my mind but it’s too late!

Click any or all three to go to See.me and like ’em. The white heart on a pink background top right is the icon to press.
seeheart


Glass Ceiling


Dancing in Greek


Tangle Mountain


Click any or all three to go to See.me and like ’em. The white heart on a pink background top right is the icon to press.
seeheart

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Rogues & Vagabonds

Re-blogged from Kimberly Eve Musings of a Writer

watts_image

Watts Gallery a museum in the heart of Surrey in England is the location of this Ellen Terry exhibit. The gallery was built upon the request of the artist himself, G.F. Watts to serve as a work space for fellow artists. G.F. Watts was the husband of a young teenage British nineteenth century theatre actress Ellen Terry who is depicted in Watts’ painting above, ‘choosing.’  The gallery describes this exhibit, ‘Ellen Terry: The Painter’s Actress will be the first exhibition to explore how the influence of Britain’s most famous Victorian actress reached beyond the stage to inspire generations of visual artists. Bringing together paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography and film – including material rarely or never previously exhibited – the show will trace Ellen Terry’s journey from emerging teenage starlet to cultural icon.’ I wish they would have decided upon a more apt…

View original post 99 more words

TRANSLATE

Award-Free Blog

About Me

about.me

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14,735 other followers

Archives

Categories

Artists 4 Peace

Twitter

FND on Twitter

Facebook

FND on Facebook

YesterdayAfter

© Sarah Vernon and First Night Design 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Sarah Vernon and First Night Design with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Nicholas Andriani

Musings of a Wandering Scholar | Writer - Poet - Academic

Joe Ruggiero at Home

Daily Reflections from My Home and Garden

Mitch Teemley

The Power of Story

Genealogy Jude

Unlocking the Door to Your Past

Jack Monroe

The #1 budget recipe website

Stevie Turner

Realist, writer, reader, reviewer and rocker.

The Stuff They Won't Include in Any Tourist Guide: The Real England

The Real England is a concise, direct, and not-so-gentle window into the depths of the leftovers of the world’s once greatest empire. It is told from the perspective of one lone (or not so lone) long term visitor. It informs one of the dregs of the country and helps to explain quaint British oddities such as the crack addicted chav.

Postcards from

home and away...

%d bloggers like this: