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Queer British Art at the Tate is a fascinating exhibition, it is more of a history of homosexuality in Britain told through artistic pieces. Some of the exhibits aren’t very queer, until you …

Source: Queer British Art, Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1 | reviewdonkey


I first encountered Vanessa Bell’s work when I was a student at the Courtauld, where I saw A Conversation and Arum Lilies, and fell in love with them. In fact, I haven’t seen that much more of her work since, so went to Dulwich Picture Gallery‘s new exhibition of Bell’s work as soon as I could. Bell is primarily known today as part of…

Source: Exhibition review: Vanessa Bell | Culture and Anarchy


FROM THE ARCHIVE 7 March 2014
What! No elephants? Visitors who read yesterday’s post will know this piece started out with elephants. After adding textures from 2 Lil’ Owls, I played around for some while adding and…

Source: First Night Design | Day at the Exhibition (What! No Heffalumps?)


James Gillray, The life of William-Cobbett, written by himself. : Now you lying varlets you shall see how a plain tale will put you down! / Js. Gillray inv. & fec. Published in London, 29 September 1809 (Lewis Walpole Library).

From The Lewis Walpole Library: James Gillray’s Hogarthian Progresses The Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington, CT, 6 April — 16 September 2016 Curated by Cynthia Roman Sequential narratio…

Source: Exhibition | James Gillray’s Hogarthian Progresses


Originally posted in The New York Times.

Georgia O’Keeffe’s “Lake George (formerly Reflection Seascape)” (1922). Credit All rights reserved, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

If you are a casual fan of Georgia O’Keeffe, you probably think of New Mexico when you think of her. After all, she lived there for decades and avidly explored the landscape in her work and her life, collecting stones and bones and accolades as one of America’s most celebrated painters.

But long before O’Keeffe embedded in the desert, her life included a period in the considerably lusher climes of upstate New York, on Lake George, the glacial Adirondack lake near here where she spent a series of summers — creating scores of paintings — while staying with Alfred Stieglitz, the photographer, art promoter and her eventual husband, whose family kept a small estate there.

Now, for the first time, some five-dozen of those creations have been brought together in an exhibition — “Modern Nature: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George” — at the Hyde Collection, a tiny museum in this modest, well-kept city of about 15,000, an hour north of Albany.

And in an impressive display of upstate pride, the Hyde exhibition, which opened here in June, has already set…

via Georgia O’Keeffe’s Lake George Paintings at Hyde Collection – The New York Times.


One from the archive, an article about the artist John Craxton, taken from the New Statesman.

First Night Design

via The world of private mystery in John Craxton’s paintings.

Islands of edgy light: Galatas (1947)Islands of edgy light: Galatas (1947)

They may not like it but it is the fate of artists, as with all interesting creatures, to be labelled. John Craxton, a friend of Graham Sutherland, Paul Nash and John Piper, has duly been filed under “neo-Romantic”. These were the painters who in the years before the Second World War rediscovered the mystical work of Samuel Palmer and William Blake and reacted to the lowering mood of the times by conjuring up a British Eden of shepherds and overgrown green lanes among billowing hills that could be pulled close like an eiderdown. Craxton refuted the label, but grudgingly accepted a more accurate one: “Arcadian”.

Dark and fecund lands: Llanthony Abbey (1942)Dark and fecund lands: Llanthony Abbey (1942)

This separation from his fellows was not just a question of taxonomy. From 1946 he lived largely in Greece, a place…

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A few days ago I received an email from See.me informing me that I had been chosen to receive three free spots on their Times Square (NY) billboard show. My work will be 10 feet (3 meters) tall on the sign. This is quite extraordinary. It’s just a shame I can’t be there to see them in person!

billboard_collage

There’s only two days left to garner likes and, if you wish, create and buy tee-shirts and postcards, but if I get enough points from these activities by you lovely chaps and chappesses to add to the 500 given free, I’m in with a chance of having an image at 200 feet (60 meters) tall. I won’t know where to put meself!

The choice of which three artworks to submit was almost impossible but in the end I went for the three you see below. Now I want to change my mind but it’s too late!

Click any or all three to go to See.me and like ’em. The white heart on a pink background top right is the icon to press.
seeheart


Glass Ceiling


Dancing in Greek


Tangle Mountain


Click any or all three to go to See.me and like ’em. The white heart on a pink background top right is the icon to press.
seeheart

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Rogues & Vagabonds

Re-blogged from Kimberly Eve Musings of a Writer

watts_image

Watts Gallery a museum in the heart of Surrey in England is the location of this Ellen Terry exhibit. The gallery was built upon the request of the artist himself, G.F. Watts to serve as a work space for fellow artists. G.F. Watts was the husband of a young teenage British nineteenth century theatre actress Ellen Terry who is depicted in Watts’ painting above, ‘choosing.’  The gallery describes this exhibit, ‘Ellen Terry: The Painter’s Actress will be the first exhibition to explore how the influence of Britain’s most famous Victorian actress reached beyond the stage to inspire generations of visual artists. Bringing together paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography and film – including material rarely or never previously exhibited – the show will trace Ellen Terry’s journey from emerging teenage starlet to cultural icon.’ I wish they would have decided upon a more apt…

View original post 99 more words


Seascape with two boats, KY by Winifred Nicholson

Seascape with two boats, KY by Winifred Nicholson

I have never really explored the work of the Nicholsons, Winifred and Ben, who were married for ten years, but now I have a chance to make up for it with the opening next month of an exhibition dedicated to the couple and their contemporaries at the Dulwich Picture Gallery, Art and Life: Ben Nicholson, Winifred Nicholson, Christopher Wood, Alfred Wallis, William Staite Murray, 1920 – 1931.

I registered with the press area of the Gallery and after studying the downloaded images, I now find myself rather enraptured by the work of all!  The exhibition will include rarely or never-seen-before oil paintings created by Winifred during their marriage.

This period had a great impact on Winifred’s art. Both she and Ben were hugely influenced by artists such as Cezanne and Picasso. Loose and bold became the order of the day.

‘Grouped by location, ‘Art and Life’ features several paintings of Cumberland where Winifred lived with Ben, such as Cumberland Landscape, which is displayed for the first time. The couple stayed in London, Lugano, Switzerland and Cornwall and regularly painted and exhibited with their friends and contemporaries Christopher Wood, William Staite Murray and later, Alfred Wallis. Winifred benefited greatly from this life of artistic exchange and Ben’s sense of adventure and his unstoppable desire to see and try new things helping her develop her own response to the modernist revolution. Winifred’s interest in colour, however, did not waver throughout her marriage to Ben, who was more preoccupied with form. The juxtaposition of specific pictures by Ben and Winifred in the exhibition sharing the same colour values shows just how much Winifred led and developed Ben’s sense of colour, for example, Ben’s 1924 (first abstract painting, Chelsea)  and Winifred’s King’s Road, Chelsea.’

Ben Nicholson, 1930 (Cornish Port)

Ben Nicholson, 1930 (Cornish Port)

The exhibition’s curator is the couple’s Art Historian grandson, Jovan Nicholson, who says:

“Winifred used flowers to express her ideas about colour and the exhibition demonstrates how by 1924 she had worked out her fundamental colour theory. Later works in the show highlight the influence of fellow artists – one of my favourite paintings is Boat on a Stormy Sea which Winifred probably painted in St. Ives after she had met the marine painter Alfred Wallis. You sense her delight in the process of painting, with her paint loaded brush whooshing across the surface of the canvas. But it also shows how much she appreciated Wallis with his natural sense of movement. For me it has been an enduring and deepening pleasure to come to know my grandparents work more closely. Most importantly I hope the show will bring much pleasure and enjoyment to the viewers.”

Alfred Wallis, Four luggars leaving a harbour, MIMA

Alfred Wallis, Four luggers leaving a harbour, MIMA

Notes

Winifred Nicholson (1893-1981) was born in Oxford as Rosa Winifred Roberts. She was the granddaughter of George Howard, 9th Earl of Carlisle, an amateur painter and friend of the Pre-Raphaelites. She studied at the Byam Shaw School of Art, and married Ben Nicholson in 1920 shortly after a visit to India. Winifred is best known for painting flowers, which she used to convey her ideas about colour. By the late 1920s she was widely respected in the London art world, with solo exhibitions at the Beaux Arts Gallery in 1927 and the Leicester Galleries in 1930. After her marriage with Ben Nicholson came under strain she moved to Paris in 1932 and befriended and collected a number of Parisian artists, including Mondrian, Gabo and Hélion.

William Staite Murray, Persian Garden, York

William Staite Murray, Persian Garden, York

Dulwich Picture Gallery
Dulwich Picture Gallery is the world’s first purpose-built public art gallery, founded in 1811 and designed by Regency architect Sir John Soane. It houses one of the finest collections of Old Masters in the country, especially rich in French, Italian and Spanish Baroque paintings and in British portraits from the Tudor period to the 19th century. The Gallery’s Permanent Collection is complemented by its diverse and critically acclaimed year round temporary exhibitions.

Anemones in a Cornish Window (oil on canvas) by Christopher Wood(1901-30) Leeds Museums and Galleries (City Art Gallery)

Anemones in a Cornish Window (oil on canvas) by Christopher Wood(1901-30) Leeds Museums and Galleries (City Art Gallery)

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Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

 


Rachel Stonestreet

I am pleased to be part of a group exhibition at the Menier Gallery, London Bridge, 20th -24th May.

The gallery is open 11.00am-6.00pm tuesday-thursday, 11.00am-8.00pm friday and 11.00am-6.00pm on the saturday. To find us on Facebook and to find out more about the photographers in the exhibition http://www.facebook.com/pages/untitled-2014

IMG_Woods Somme

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Culture and Anarchy

20140411-111845 pm.jpg

One of the many commemorations of the start of the Great War is the National Portrait Gallery’s exhibition ‘The Great War in Portraits’. I am reluctant to comment too much as I found that to wander around the rooms and look at the paintings on display was a slightly surreal experience (and consequently I didn’t take as many notes as usual!) but the exhibition shows us what is literally the changing face of war. From individuals involved in the start of the war – military and political figures, as well as a press portrait of the assassin of Archduke Franz Ferdinand – to images intended as propaganda, displaying military might and dignity, the stages of the war are reflected in the work of the artists. Most moving, perhaps, are the faces of the soldiers affected by the conflict20140411-111858 pm.jpg, especially those damaged by shells, which were drawn for hospital…

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What! No elephants?

Visitors who read yesterday’s post will know this piece started out with elephants. After adding textures from 2 Lil’ Owls, I played around for some while adding and deleting various elements until despair set in. Okay, I’m exaggerating but my patience ran out when I couldn’t create what I  envisaged. I was still looking through my archives for other elements that might help realise my vision when I came across this vintage postcard of the entrance to the British Textile Pavilion at the Franco-British Exhibition in area of London that is now known as White City in 1908. It was held to celebrate the Entente Cordiale signed in 1904 by the United Kingdom and France. I put it in the frame with the idea that I would make it a smaller, collage-like element.

franco_british_exhibitionblog

But…as soon as I saw what the Pavilion looked like with this 2 Lil’ Owls texture, I deleted the elephants.

2LO Shabby Creek 10blog

Day at the Exhibition was on its way. After some adjustments, it was ready.

I leave you with a couple of limericks that were penned to advertise the event that I discovered on the Exhibition’s entry at Wikipedia.

A maiden of coy disposition,
Met her fate at the Bush Exhibition,
When his great love he told her,
Placed her head on his shoulder,
And enjoyed the happier position.
In an Anglo-French section one night,
A Youth met a Maiden, gay and bright,
But her idea of pleasure,
Was of such boundless measure,
He left with heart heavy – purse light.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


via The world of private mystery in John Craxton’s paintings.

They may not like it but it is the fate of artists, as with all interesting creatures, to be labelled. John Craxton, a friend of Graham Sutherland, Paul Nash and John Piper, has duly been filed under “neo-Romantic”. These were the painters who in the years before the Second World War rediscovered the mystical work of Samuel Palmer and William Blake and reacted to the lowering mood of the times by conjuring up a British Eden of shepherds and overgrown green lanes among billowing hills that could be pulled close like an eiderdown. Craxton refuted the label, but grudgingly accepted a more accurate one: “Arcadian”.

This separation from his fellows was not just a question of taxonomy. From 1946 he lived largely in Greece, a place where, he wrote, “I find it’s possible to feel a real person – real people, real elements, real windows – real sun above all. In a life of reality my imagination really works. I feel like an émigré in London and squashed FLAT.” But in finding an authentic Arcadia in Crete he also distanced himself from the art and artists of the postwar world and so slipped out of the story. “A World of Private Mystery: John Craxton RA (1922-2009)”, a small but choice exhibition at the Fitzwilliam, is an overview and reminder of the career of this unfashionably joyous painter.

Read more…

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

Related articles

 


Will you be in Miami in December?  My artwork will be on display at the See.me booth as part of the SCOPE Art Fair 2013 December 3 – 8. The work will be displayed in rotation on several HD plasma screens. Very exciting.  I only wish I could teleport over the ocean to see!

The Minaret

To whet your appetite, the SCOPE website describes its art fairs thus: ‘With over 65 art fairs spanning more than a decade, SCOPE is the largest and most global art fair in the world, celebrated as the premier showcase for international emerging contemporary art and multi-disciplinary creative programming. Renowned for its uncanny ability to forecast new visual trends that are embraced globally, SCOPE Art Shows in Miami, Basel, New York, London and the Hamptons have garnered extensive critical acclaim, with sales of over $500 million and attendance of over 700,000 visitors.’

To see my portfolio and vote for me (giving me the possibility of a grant), please click on the image above or HERE.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


English: L.S. Lowry memorial

This Lowry exhibition offers a contextual perspective that refutes the oft-used ‘twee’ tag, according to Serena Trowbridge.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

Culture and Anarchy

lowry_web-banner_option3_0Probably one of the most popular exhibitions at the moment isLowry and the Painting of Modern Life” at Tate Britain. Lowry’s work has had an interesting reception, historically, I think: he is remarkably popular, appealing to a wide range of people, and this combined with his instantly recognisable style means that he can be looked down upon by art historians as perhaps not a serious artist, possibly a little bit twee. This exhibition does much to rectify that perception, I think, by contextualising Lowry’s work and emphasising its historical significance and Lowry’s own engagement with working-class life. The exhibition constructs Lowry as an artist of anti-sentiment, focussed on the reality of industrial life and urban people, and even a cursory glance at his paintings confirms this. Lowry saw art as a necessity for understanding and engaging with modern life, and there is no doubt that he relentlessly depicts…

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