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FROM THE ARCHIVE 15/11/2013

The other day I was studying an old photograph that I had taken while on holiday in Crete of the Venetian Harbour in Chania. I was wondering what I could do with it.  In fact, I’d been lookin…

Source: Four Works: Digital Art, Master Photographers & Vintage Delights


It’s time for another of my Edward Steichen-like Hollywood makeovers. When I’m in need of some glamour, I head straight for the silent movie headshots of the 1920s, especially as found on Hello Tuesday at Deviant Art, which is where I discovered this photograph of Louise Brooks.


“I never gave away anything without wishing I had kept it; nor kept anything without wishing I had given it away.”
Louise Brooks


Some of you may remember that I was originally inspired by Edward Steichen’s famous photograph of actress Gloria Swanson covered in lace (Museum of Modern Art).  I’ve already done one such of Louise Brooks and this is ‘Take 2’!

In what one might say is now time-honoured fashion, I overlaid Brooks with this lace effect vintage wallpaper from MGB-Stock.


“Most beautiful dumb girls think they are smart and get away with it, because other people, on the whole, aren’t much smarter.”
Louise Brooks


For more Hollywood Tattoo makeovers, click here.

Available at the following galleries:
Redbubble
Crated
Zazzle US
Zazzle UK
Fine Art America
Fine Art England
Saatchi Art

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


FROM THE ARCHIVE — I THOUGHT IT WAS HIGH TIME FOR SOME HOLLYWOOD GLAMOUR!

Here is another in my Hollywood series that takes its inspiration from the famous Edward Steichen portrait of actress Gloria Swanson covered in lace and held by the Museum of Modern Art.  The Greta Garbo photo (Hello-Tuesday), and the vintage wallpaper (MGB-Stock) that I used to create the lace effect, are from Deviantart.

Garbo’s skin in the original shot is so luminous that I was, at first, reluctant to…

Source: First Night Design | The Greta Garbo Tattoo


Originally posted on The Genealogy of Style.

Experiment in Three Color Photography, by Edward Steichen. Camera Work No 15, 1906

“When I first became interested in photography… my idea was to have it recognized as one of the fine arts. Today I don’t give a hoot in hell about that. The mission of photography is to explain man to man and each man to himself. And that is the most complicated thing on earth and also as naïve as a tender plant.”

Edward Steichen

via The Most Complicated Thing On Earth | The Genealogy of Style.


Originally posted on First Night Design.

Stormy Weather @ First Night Design

Stormy Weather @ First Night Design

The other day I was studying an old photograph that I had taken while on holiday in Crete of the Venetian Harbour in Chania. I was wondering what I could do with it.  In fact, I’d been looking at it and wondering for some years because it doesn’t stand alone as a photograph.  It wasn’t until I was going through my cache of background textures for another piece that inspiration struck. I chanced upon a photograph of moss-covered rock which,  combined with the harbour, formed the basis of an image I could work on.  A number of tweaks here and several blending changes there (in Photoshop, as usual) enabled me to create this kind of dirty Canaletto-crossed-with-J M W Turner, if you will!

The Gloria Swanson Tattoo was inspired by Edward Steichen‘s well-known headshot of the Hollywood actress covered in lace and held by the Museum of Modern Art. I had remembered it as an image by Man Ray so it is just as well that I checked.  Both photographers were renowned for their Hollywood and fashion photography in the 1920s and 1930s. The Swanson photo (Hello-Tuesday) and the vintage wallpaper (MGB-Stock) image  I used to create the lace effect…

via Four Works: Digital Art, Master Photographers & Vintage Delights | First Night Design.


I’m hoping Father Christmas might bring me a new computer so my struggles with data roaming can be consigned to tech bin of history!

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah x

First Night Design

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In view of my emulating Edward Steichen’s photograph of Gloria Swanson covered in lace with my Hollywood tattoo series, it is fascinating to see his early work in this 1900 portrait of the painter G F Watts who, as readers familiar with this blog will know, was once married to the actress Ellen Terry.

Background description from National Portrait Gallery, “In 1900, Watts was aged 83 and the doyen of the art world, having outlived most of his contemporaries. He is shown here, in a photogravure from the American publication Camera Work, as a venerable figure whose profile features are illuminated by a single light source, perhaps a window. The pictorial style draws attention to the painterly composition and chiaroscuro derived from old master portraiture. In this respect, Steichen’s image – one of two poses from the same sitting – evokes an elderly version of Watts’s ‘Venetian Senator’ self-portrait of c.1853, although its immediate inspiration seems to be Watts’s profile self-portraits of 1879–80 (see ‘All known portraits’). It has also been argued that Steichen’s admiration for European Symbolist painting is reflected in the composition,  and doubtless such admiration drew Steichen towards Watts, whose late allegorical paintings proved major contributions to the Symbolist impulse. The exact circumstances of this portrait-making remain somewhat unclear, however.

American photographer Edward Steichen travelled to Europe in summer 1900 to study painting in Paris. In September he visited London to…

via Kimberly Eve Musings of a Writer: George Frederic Watts by Edward Steichen.


One from the archives to celebrate the anniversary of Clara Bow’s birth on this day in 1905.

First Night Design

The Clara Bow Tattoo © First Night Design The Clara Bow Tattoo © First Night Design

This modern treatment of a Clara Bow photograph was inspired, like The Gloria Swanson Tattoo and The Louise Brooks Tattoo, by Edward Steichen‘s headshot of the Hollywood actress Gloria Swanson covered in lace and held by the Museum of Modern Art. The Clara Bow photo (Hello-Tuesday), and the vintage wallpaper (MGB-Stock) that I used to create the lace effect, are from Deviantart.

The image will soon be for sale at my various online galleries.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

View original post 24 more words


Here is another in my Hollywood series that takes its inspiration from the famous Edward Steichen portrait of actress Gloria Swanson covered in lace and held by the Museum of Modern Art.  The Greta Garbo photo (Hello-Tuesday), and the vintage wallpaper (MGB-Stock) that I used to create the lace effect, are from Deviantart.

Garbo’s skin in the original shot is so luminous that I was, at first, reluctant to give her the same treatment as SwansonClara Bow and Louise Brooks but everyone urged me on, so here she is!


“There is no one who would have me – I can’t cook.”

“Anyone who has a continuous smile on his face conceals a toughness that is almost frightening.”

“I never said, ‘I want to be alone.’ I only said, ‘I want to be left alone.’ There is all the difference.”

“There are some who want to get married and others who don’t. I have never had an impulse to go to the altar. I am a difficult person to lead.”


Related sites

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


This modern treatment of a Clara Bow photograph was inspired, like The Gloria Swanson Tattoo and The Louise Brooks Tattoo, by Edward Steichen‘s headshot of the Hollywood actress Gloria Swanson covered in lace and held by the Museum of Modern Art. The Clara Bow photo (Hello-Tuesday), and the vintage wallpaper (MGB-Stock) that I used to create the lace effect, are from Deviantart. Art Prints

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


Just like The Gloria Swanson Tattoo in earlier posts, this treatment of a Louise Brooks photograph was inspired by Edward Steichen‘s headshot of the Hollywood actress covered in lace and held by the Museum of Modern Art. The Louise Brooks photo (Hello-Tuesday), and the vintage wallpaper (MGB-Stock) that I used to create the lace effect, are from Deviantart.

I could have chosen one of the widely known photographs of Louise Brooks but this one appealed to me more than the usual, partly because I had not come across it before and partly because she looks so soignée in male attire.

The still is from a 1928 film, Beggars of Life, where Brooks plays a girl who disguises herself in beggar’s clothing to escape the police after killing her abusive stepfather. Directed by William Wellman, it also stars Wallace Beery, Richard Arlen and Roscoe Karns, and was based on a book by Jim Tully, published in 1924.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah


I’m in love with my Gloria Swanson.  I’m showing off more wares with this design in the hope that you, too, will want to surround yourself with some vintage Hollywood glamour!


The other day I was studying an old photograph that I had taken while on holiday in Crete of the Venetian Harbour in Chania. I was wondering what I could do with it.  In fact, I’d been looking at it and wondering for some years because it doesn’t stand alone as a photograph.  It wasn’t until I was going through my cache of background textures for another piece that inspiration struck. I chanced upon a photograph of moss-covered rock which,  combined with the harbour, formed the basis of an image I could work on.  A number of tweaks here and several blending changes there (in Photoshop, as usual) enabled me to create this kind of dirty Canaletto-crossed-with-J M W Turner, if you will!

The Gloria Swanson Tattoo was inspired by Edward Steichen‘s well-known headshot of the Hollywood actress covered in lace and held by the Museum of Modern Art. I had remembered it as an image by Man Ray so it is just as well that I checked.  Both photographers were renowned for their Hollywood and fashion photography in the 1920s and 1930s. The Swanson photo (Hello-Tuesday) and the vintage wallpaper (MGB-Stock) image  I used to create the lace effect are from Deviantart.

There’s a rather marvellous shop in Berlin that sells vintage postcards, a shop I discovered a few years ago. Bartko-Reher-OHG’s site provides hours of delight and I have to be strong not to buy up all their stock in any one day!  I bought the above  Charlie Chaplin postcard about three years ago but it has taken me this long to do anything with it!

This last image is a vintage advertisement from The Graphics Fairy which stars the singer and dancer Mademoiselle Vanoni who was, according to an old cutting from The New York Times, dated 30 March, 1885, an exuberant performer. I have no doubt of it!

Have a lovely weekend.

Take care and keep laughing!

Sarah

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