London And The War Artists Advisory Committee – A London Inheritance


Demolition Workers, Oxford Street, London W1
Demolition Workers, Oxford Street, London W1

When I was researching my post of a couple of week’s ago on the Temple church, I found some paintings of the damaged church in the Imperial War Museum online archive. I was aware of the work of a number of war artists, but what I did not know about was the organisation that these paintings referenced, and that was the driving force behind…

via London And The War Artists Advisory Committee – A London Inheritance

14 thoughts on “London And The War Artists Advisory Committee – A London Inheritance

  1. I read a book by the great travel writer Paul Theroux called “The Kingdom By The Sea”, where he traveled around England using only small commuter trains…a thing of the past mostly now, but a great look at England by rail – and I posted a story about English trains as well – this historical type of thing fascinates me, so thanks for sharing! – https://johnrieber.com/2013/08/30/sixty-years-of-amazing-london-trains-what-a-compilation/

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  2. What a great selection of images of London at that time, really enjoyable.
    When I was a child, the area around St Paul’s had changed little from the scenes shown in those paintings.
    Best wishes, Pete. x

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    1. I’m sure. I’m only now realising how little had changed when you and I were born and how much destruction via ‘progress has happened since. I’m following old Richmond on FB and most of the photographs, while taken decades before I was born, show Richmond as I remember the place in the ’50s and ’60s.

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    1. It’s such fun to find them. Mind you, there’s always a part of me that thinks sadly: ‘Oh, a missed opportunity to showcase and sell my own work’. But if I haven’t created anything new, I haven’t created anything new! And there’s only so many times one can re-blog favourites.

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  3. Fascinating stuff. I had no idea there was a WAAC or how it operated. I enjoyed the mini bios of the artists, as well. The images are stirring, and some of them are quite moving.

    It’s probably unfair to pick a fave, but Ethel Gabain’s works really resonated with me. She seems to make the war intimate – if that makes sense? Like you’re a part of these people’s lives.

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    1. I’m so glad you got so much from the post. The odd thing is that the work I like least is that by Ethel Gabain! There’s one that I’m surprised to be so affected by and that’s Henry Moore’s (not a sculptor I admire) “Women and Children in the Tube. And while Churchill hated Graham Sutherland’s portrait of him, this artist’s “Fallen Lift Shaft” makes me shiver.

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