Synesthesia: When Tuesday Is The Color Red – Neuroscience News


I have Synesthesia, as I believe I have mentioned before. It is not very pronounced and is more or less restricted to days of the week which I see in colour and shape. My Tuesday, for instance, is a half-moon shape with see-through curves in a watery blue-grey.

When I told my doctor that the sight of a starfish tastes like copper she sat across from me in silence, waiting for the punchline.

“I’m dead serious.” I laughed. “It tastes like a penny in my mouth.”

For as long as I can remember I have experienced an overlapping of senses of some sort. Sometimes sight is combined with…

Source: Synesthesia: When Tuesday Is The Color Red – Neuroscience News

32 thoughts on “Synesthesia: When Tuesday Is The Color Red – Neuroscience News

  1. I definitely equate colour and movement to music…When I view a Kandinsky – I could almost begin singing the notes…..however, I don’t have synesthesia in the way that you do. Maybe I should take more special notice to my sense reactions. Thank you, Sarah for a very interesting post…and of course keep smiling and enjoy the day…Janet:)xx

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    1. I’ve always imagined there are many such ‘conditions’ that because we don’t discuss them, we assume everyone is the same. I remember when I first discovered it had a name, I was astounded and couldn’t wait to tell my mother. We had been dismissed as mad by my father . Well, one of us was, course. Happy Tuesday and keep smiling. xxx

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  2. I have looked this condition up previously. I am not sure if it should be regarded as an affliction, or a wonderful gift. Its association with artists and musicians seems to suggest the latter.
    Best wishes, Pete. x

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  3. i’ve read about this and it is fascinating to me. i see it as a gift, a whole other way to experience the world around us, but i’m sure it depends on the way, you feel as the one holding the gift.

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  4. A freelance editor had synesthesia (would that be “was synesthesiac”?) who I worked with swore she could tell when a writer did from the color combinations their words made. There’s a whole world out there that I can’t touch–and can barely imagine.

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    1. My level is fascinating rather than difficult but I do know there are some whose senses overlap to such an extent that it makes many aspects of life exceedingly hard. Laughing? How dare you! Big hugs back. xxx

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  5. Sarah, I was happy to see Kandinsky on your post and when I saw it was in reference to your synesthesia, I was excited since I have it too. I mention it from time to time( sometimes it’s crazy art!). I’ve been blessed with tasting color or gustatory-visual-olfactory syn. Crazy indeed but as long as I’ve got lots of pretty paints I’m happy. Blessed even! 😉

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  6. I believe that is a Kandinsky painting? He was a genius with a fascinating life. My preschoolers love his art. I highly recommend “The Noisy Paintbox”, an award winning children’s picture book about his life.

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      1. I am so glad! I promise the picture book will not disappoint. Really. For preschoolers, Kandinsky’s art has the freedom and color that entices them to paint and try and learn. An art and history story I love (you will too): Eric Carle and his family returned to Germany at the urging of his aunt in 1932 or 33. Eric had already discovered his interest in art. He did well in high school and of course the war was in full swing by then. His art teacher risked his own life to show Eric Carle “forbidden art”; the art
        of Matisse, Picasso, and Kandinsky (there is a fourth artist I am forgetting). That changed Eric Carle’s life. The rest is history. I love that story!

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  7. I’ve always been intrigued by synesthesia and actually created characters with the sensory *enhancement* in one of my books. I’ve always wondered whether it’s an acuity versus a deficit, and whether it’s just “the commonfolk” being unable to appreciate “the gifted.”

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