Dulac and Shakespeare: faeries and phantoms | The Library Time Machine


The first two decades of the twentieth century are sometimes referred to as the golden age of book illustration. It was a combination of skilled artists, advances in printing techniques and a book loving public willing to buy prestige or gift editions of classic books. We’ve already featured examples of this in posts about the artist Hugh Thomson who tried to produce one “big” book a year in the pre-WW1 period. Hodder and Stoughton were one of the publishers who embraced this trend, and one of their lines was a series of new versions of Shakespeareare plays. Thomson himself did As you like it for Hodder and later the Merry Wives of Windsor for Heinemann. W. Heath Robinson did Twelfth Night. And our new friend Edmund Dulac did one of the best…

Source: Dulac and Shakespeare: faeries and phantoms | The Library Time Machine

12 thoughts on “Dulac and Shakespeare: faeries and phantoms | The Library Time Machine

  1. I love this image. I am taken back to my childhood when ‘picture books’ were such a treasure. I recall sitting for hours looking through and imagining myself either within the book and image or painting my own pictures. Hours and hours of pure pleasure. Thank you dear Sarah for once again beginning my week on such a positive note….Keep smiling my friend. Janet:):)xx

    Liked by 1 person

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