A Brief History of Ultramarine—The World’s Costliest Color


Originally posted in The Paris Review.

Full title: The Virgin in Prayer Artist: Sassoferrato Date made: 1640-50 Source: http://www.nationalgalleryimages.co.uk/ Contact: picture.library@nationalgallery.co.uk Copyright © The National Gallery, London
Full title: The Virgin in Prayer
Artist: Sassoferrato
Date made: 1640-50
Copyright © The National Gallery, London

Michelangelo couldn’t afford ultramarine. His painting The Entombment, the story goes, was left unfinished as the result of his failure to procure the prized pigment. Rafael reserved ultramarine for his final coat, preferring for his base layers a common azurite; Vermeer was less parsimonious in his application and proceeded to mire his family in debt. Ultramarine: the quality of the shade is embodied in its name. This is the superlative blue, the end-all blue, the blue to which all other hues quietly aspire. The name means “beyond the sea”—a dreamy ode to its distant origins, as romantic as it is imprecise.

Derived from the lapis lazuli stone, the pigment was considered more precious than gold. For centuries, the lone source of ultramarine was an arid strip of mountains in northern Afghanistan. The process of extraction involved grinding the stone into a fine powder, infusing the deposits with melted wax, oils, and pine resin, and then kneading…

via A Brief History of Ultramarine—The World’s Costliest Color.

22 thoughts on “A Brief History of Ultramarine—The World’s Costliest Color

        1. We are and we’ve chosen not to get a Greek bank account. The most corrupt (just like the UK) have always been the politicians and the corporate businessmen. Whenever we talk to our friends, they beg us to correct the impression given in the European press or certainly the British press that they’re a nation of feckless, corrupt tax-avoiders. The bulk of the population is as sound as you or I.

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